Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: Brandy without Coke, Cheap cigarettes and being footloose in Ovahimba land  (Read 4361 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Fransw

Vir 'n derde taal doen jy donners goed.   :biggrin:   :peepwall:

Voorspoed vir die trip en hoop als loop voorspoedig.   :deal:

Dankie Louis - wen jy met die paspoorte

Ja, paspoorte is vining deesdae. My vorige een nie eers n week! :thumleft:

Gesort dankie, sal seker volgende week al gaan optel.   :thumleft: :thumleft:
 

Offline Hardy de Kock

  • Chief cook and bottle washer
  • Vendors
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Thanked: 954 times
    • Specialised Adventures
This thing about lions, elephants, de-hydration and heat exhaustion

Lions

In all my time riding Northern Namibia, I have only ever once had a dangerous encounter with lions. Unfortunately co-existence between the lions and the locals becomes harder each day, and as long as the local cattle farmers lose cattle through lion attacks, they will continue to poison or hunt these magnificent beasts. Not enough is being done to put in place fencing for the cattle, and this endangers the future existence of desert lions in the Kaokoland. I have a few chiefs and herdsmen who I make contact with, every time we head north, and I do get the co-ordinates of the collared lions from a source, to enable us in planning our routes once we get close to the areas the lions frequent. To see these lions in the desert is a holistic and almost surreal experience.

Elephants

Of all the threats and dangers in this area, I rate the elephants the highest. It is also the one animal you really want to see when you visit this  Arid Eden. Elephants are temperamental, and it really is not a good idea to ride up to them if you are sitting on the back of a motorcycle that forces 100+ decibels down their ear holes.
The elephants are mostly to be found in and along the riverbeds where the green foliage grows in abundance.
It is not as easy as it might sound to turn a 170kg motorcycle around to get away once you spotted an elephant that seems to have appeared out of nowhere from under an Ana tree's shade in the middle of the day with that damn loose sand working against you.  I ask my groups to view these animals from a distance and not to go closer, and I have never had problems. There is one particular young bull with whom I have a love/hate relationship in the Puros conservancy region called Jabu.
Jabu has accepted the role of protector of the herd and he fulfill's this roll with pride and passion. If ever you find yourself in this beautiful area, make a point of it to ask the locals where Jabu is - If they say that he is in the canyon, I suggest you make other plans than riding the canyon. He is really much faster than you think - trust me I know, and he usually stays with cows that has a baby. (I am sure I don't need to explain any further..)

De-hydration and heat exhaustion

I had a guy that worked for me for more than ten years before he resigned to continue a career in aviation. Gary Webber is a Rhodesian that grew up in the Mateke Hills region of the now Zimbabwe before his family were asked to give up their livelihood and their home for a 23 year old "war veteran"
Gary worked all over Africa with me and is as tough as they come.
We did a recce of new routes in the Kaokoland once (his first time there) and were on our way to Epupa when I realized that he has gone really quite.
We rode inland (following the trail along the foot of the Zebra mountains) and not next to the Kunene as we usually do.
When we got to camp Gary immediately walked up to the river and started washing his face. I knew that Gary were well aware of the Kunene crocs and found it strange that he would do something like that.
20 mintes later he asked me if I felt ok as he was not. Another 10 minutes later he started to hallucinate. He started screaming and told me that he believed he was poisoned. This was the first time I have ever seen someone being knocked down properly from dehydration and heat exhaustion.
I know there are people with a natural ability to fence of this evil occurrence, but I have seen what it can do to a guy that did the Sahara with me without ever complaing about anything,  and it is not pretty.
From this day on, I have made a point of it to ensure that all our guests fill up on re-hydrates every day and I am happy to say that I have not had a severe case since.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2021, 02:58:27 pm by Hardy de Kock »
a Wise man once said absolutely nothing...
 
The following users thanked this post: Sandban(g)k, Chantal Burger, big oil, Annemien vdL

Offline neil-ph

........but I have seen what it can do to a guy that did the Sahara with me without ever complaing about anything,  and it is not pretty.......

Believe it, it's real.

Scouting a massive area in southern Tanzania back in the 1990's, much of it was done on foot, following the old 1:50000 maps of old. One would pretty much guess where the water sources are and plan recce's accordingly, inevitably changing routes to follow animal tracks which invariably led to hidden springs.

Never went to plan the one day, and our decision to turn back to the vehicle, a 7 hour walk, was wise. Water was low and not assured of any natural water up ahead, I could not risk it to the team.

We made it 6 km back when it struck. Three of us collapsed with heat exhaustion and dehydration. Then, the hallucinations. We were fortunate that the vehicle wasn't too far off and the driver hastily went for more water. The effects lasted a few days, but holy shit, a lesson was learned that day.

Sent from my vivo 1820 using Tapatalk

Never hesitate to take that ride. Ride safe, ride often and ride far. The soul demands it.

All men die, but not all men live......
 
The following users thanked this post: Hardy de Kock, Oubones, Chantal Burger, big oil, Annemien vdL

Offline Hollywood

  • Pack Dog
  • **
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 130
  • Thanked: 26 times
Aaaahh.... dŪs mos nou iets om na uit te sien!

Jislaaik @Hardy de Kock, nadat ons my trip 3 keer na mekaar moes uitstel, lees ek maar met swaarigheid... ek het toevallig vandag na daai NamibAir vouchers en uitstel e-mails gekyk. Bliksems.

Ek volg opgewonde.

Sent from my SM-G780F using Tapatalk

Addicted to riding big bikes in tricky places.
Rode most of Southern Africa.
Currently riding a slightly pimped black Africa Twin Manual, named Fezile
 

Offline JMOL

  • The Mayor of Mopani
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS Adventure
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 4,380
  • Thanked: 81 times
  • East London
Hoe meer ek die lees, hoe meer lus raak ek vir so iets.

Beslis die moeite werd om te volg.

 :sip:

Life is hard - even harder if you are stupid.
 

Offline Ian in Great Brak River

  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 3,305
  • Thanked: 134 times
Following along again with great interest.
1978. It's 6am, mid winter...two up on a XL 185S ... off to my first casino ever with all of R40 and we've got a full tank of fuel, so enough to get there we reckon.... that's determination...

Old bike: '82 Eddie Lawson Replica Replica.
Other bike: '05 Honda Varadero 1000
New bike: '16 Honda Africa Twin.
 

Offline Vis Arend

  • It's not how fast you start, it's how long you endure.
  • Grey hound
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda CRF-250 Rally
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 9,025
  • Thanked: 416 times
Hoe meer ek die lees, hoe meer lus raak ek vir so iets.

Beslis die moeite werd om te volg.

 :sip:

Onthou net, driekwart van die hooligans wat gaan  kom daar van jou se dorp.       :biggrin: :biggrin:
No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the the couch
Honda XL125  -  Sold,    Honda XR200R  -  Sold,     Yamaha TT500  -  Sold,     Honda Transalp700  -  Sold,       Yamaha S10 Fast Blue  -  Sold,   Yamaha S10 Slow White  -  Sold,   Honda CRF250 Rally - To be Sold, XR650L - Sold,   Honda CRF250Rally back in the stable,   BMW K1200LT.
 

Offline JMOL

  • The Mayor of Mopani
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS Adventure
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 4,380
  • Thanked: 81 times
  • East London
Hoe meer ek die lees, hoe meer lus raak ek vir so iets.

Beslis die moeite werd om te volg.

 :sip:

Onthou net, driekwart van die hooligans wat gaan  kom daar van jou se dorp.       
Ek ken hulle.  Gawe klomp Ingelse

Hardy het hul goed opgesom.

Sent from my SM-A505F using Tapatalk

Life is hard - even harder if you are stupid.
 

Offline Hardy de Kock

  • Chief cook and bottle washer
  • Vendors
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Thanked: 954 times
    • Specialised Adventures
The right bike and other myths

I get this question at least once a week and more frequently when people inquire about our tours. It is never easy to tell someone that I do not think they will enjoy the tour so much on their newly acquired 790cc bike, duly fitted with every conceivable extra.
Let me give you an example:

Story 1

In 2016 I was contacted by an long time friend in the filming industry. He wanted to know if I would would be willing to host a very unique tour. His two nephews (twins) and 12 of their friends, who were friends since pre-school wanted to celebrate their 45 year friendship and their 50th birthdays by way of a tour of Namibia on motorcycles. These fourteen friends were living in different places all over the world and they would fly into SA two days before the trip. They would from here fly directly to Windhoek where I will collect them.
I assume some of them were relatively wealthy because they bought brand new bikes here, with the understanding that they will use it for the tour and sell it afterwards.
I had to collect these brand new 350cc bikes from a reputable dealer in Pretoria and trailer them up to Windhoek.
To cut a long story short, we had to find space for three of these riders and their bikes in/on our vehicles within the first three days, and they ended up touring Namibia from the inside of a Land Cruiser, and their thrills were limited to taking pictures of their friends having fun on their older, but more reliable, and obviously tried and tested bikes.

Story two

In 2017 I hosted a tour for a group of riders which had four or five self proclaimed riding gods among them. These guys told me that they were fully capable of doing the tour with their 1200cc Bavarian steeds. GS challenge and Lesotho tours were mentioned when I asked about their abilities.

Gary (the Rhodesian mentioned earlier in the thread) bought himself a DRZ 400 a couple of months prior to the tour as he was going to ride back up. The bike cost him 25 grand and it had a long range fuel tank as an added bonus. He spent around 1500 rand on the bike to have it properly serviced and were very chuffed with how the bike performed.

After day three of the tour, two of the 1200 cc riders started a bidding war for Gary's DRZ. Gary eventually sold it, at around 20km into the trail from Okangwati that leads to Van Zyl's camp for more than double the money he paid for the DRZ. I had to ride back up with a 1200cc bike for the rest of the tour because Gary refused to. He found solace in my bakkie where he contemplated his future with his new found riches.

When you decide to do a tour like this please consider doing the following:

- Be very honest with yourself about your riding ability. The Kaokoland will challenge you in every possible way, and if your skill level is outranked by the size of your bike, you will struggle and you will be exhausted every day.
- Do not go there with a bike that you have not done a proper ride with. a New bike does not guarantee you trouble free riding.
- Familiarize yourself with the maintenance requirements of your bike. It just looks silly if you don't know where the air-filter is positioned on your bike (True story)
- Take it easy and enjoy the environment. Racing through a place that 0,1% of the biking community will ever have the opportunity to experience does not make any sense, does it?
- The same principle applies to gear - Please ride with well used and very comfortable gear. New boots will hurt you and I do not know any rider that will lend you he's, just because yours is uncomfortable.


« Last Edit: March 20, 2021, 06:56:20 am by Hardy de Kock »
a Wise man once said absolutely nothing...
 
The following users thanked this post: Chantal Burger, big oil, Annemien vdL

Offline Oubones

I could not agree with Hardy more!
My story.
I have a good Dakar that I had done Lesotho as well as some valley rides on with the guys with plastics, also did a very washed out Ongeluksnek pass with it! After long talks between me and Hardy, I bought a Fugly for R15 000 and with some help from the wds, especially PshycoPorra and dieseldawie I got familiar with the bike and as to kit, left my gs pro boots at home and used my old Triumph adventure boots!
I had a great trip and with Dirtrat? Craigís help, I mastered the sand and even though my bike did spread some mosquito repellant( clouds of blue smoke when over 2000rpm :peepwall:) I had a ball! Never had sore feet and after the trip sold the bike back to the previous owner for nearly what I paid for it!
I also got myself a pair of pedal bike riding padded shorts and every stop took off my riding pants to keep my temp down.
I drank my rehidrate and wet my buff and shirt before leaving every stop and had no issues as to dehidration or rashes or anything.
If I had taken my Dakar up, I would not have enjoyed the trip nearly as much!
I have actually recently acquired a Ttr250 for use on similar rides and am sure that I am going to enjoy it much more than a bigger bike. There is very few sections where you need more than a 100km/h!
Dakar 650
SR 500
 
The following users thanked this post: big oil

Offline teebag

Sage advice Hardy thank you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Offline Hardy de Kock

  • Chief cook and bottle washer
  • Vendors
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Thanked: 954 times
    • Specialised Adventures
Sage advice Hardy thank you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 :imaposer: - my pleasure you old bullet you..
a Wise man once said absolutely nothing...
 

Offline Just Blip It!

  • Forum Vendor
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 990 Adventure
    Location: Mpumalanga
  • Posts: 2,359
  • Thanked: 19 times
  • www.adventureriderssa.co.za
Sub!   :sip:
Riding Africa's lesser traveled tracks, discovering true adventure!
2007 KTM990 Adventure S
2012 KTM 990R Adventure.
 

Offline Hardy de Kock

  • Chief cook and bottle washer
  • Vendors
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Thanked: 954 times
    • Specialised Adventures
So many special places and so little time

The group of riders that will join us in May are particularly experienced and skilled riders. I have therefor decided to tweak the tracks a little to make it even more interesting for them.

Here is a short breakdown of the places these riders will be see each day: (I am not listing the roadside shebeen's here  :deal:)

Day 01

- Okanhandja
- Karibib
- Usakos
- Spitzkoppe - The riders will have ample time to explore Spitzkoppe and the village on their bikes or by foot. The pub at Spitzkoppe will be busy this evening.

Day 02

- Omaruru river
- Uis
- Anixab
- Ugab river
- Sorris Sorris
- Granietkop
- Aba Huab river
- Desolation Valley
- Palmwag The pool next to the pub at Palmwag will double it's revenue this evening. During this time of the year the camp is frequented by the elehants

Day 03

Khuwarib
Warmquelle
Anabeb
Otjomatemba Pass
Baobab Valley
Skelm river
Okatumba settlement
Opuwo - The pool at the lodge will be fantastic after a long day in the sun. The views over Etanga Valley while sipping on a draught is priceless.

Day 4

- Mount Otjivize
- Epembe
- Swartbooisdrift
- Kunene river trail
- Epupa Falls (Ex- Recce Koos Verwey will keep the group busy with war stories and cold beer this evening.

The rest of the tour to follow soon :thumleft:



a Wise man once said absolutely nothing...
 
The following users thanked this post: Chantal Burger, Annemien vdL

Offline Hardy de Kock

  • Chief cook and bottle washer
  • Vendors
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Thanked: 954 times
    • Specialised Adventures
Day 05

- Okangwati
- Otjitanda and the famous "Heartbreak Hill"
- Otjihende
- Van Zyl's Camp (an interesting day where the first 70km takes one hour and the next 70km another 5 hours

Day 06

- Van Zyl's Pass
- Van Zyl's Pass viewpoint
- The Step
- The Memorial
- Marienfluss
- Rooidrom
- Rooidrom Pass
- Marble Camp (The route that everyone wants to ride with all these legendary places packed into one trail)

Day 07

- Onjuva village
- Otjiha plains
- Khumib river 4x4 trail
- Mt Himba Sphinx
- Huarusib 4x4 trail
- Sundowner at Jan Joubert koppie
- Puros (My most favourite place in the Kaokoland, and one of the most beautiful places on earth)

Day 08

- Puros town
- Puros Canyon if Jabu allows it
- Tsuxub river
- Ganias plains
- Puros

Day 09

- Gomatum Canyon
- Tokamas
- Gribies plains
- Ford Sesfontein
- Warmquelle
- Ongongo Hot Springs
- Khuwarib Camp (Another beautiful day in the saddle that will end at the famous Khuwarib Schlught where a swimming pool and pub awaits)

Day 10

- Khuwarib Schlught in the Hoanib river
- Ombonde river
- Klein Serengeti
- Otjondeka trail
 -Palmwag
- Bergsig
- Fonteine farm
- Desolation Valley
- Aba Huab river
- Twyfelfontein (Where yet another swimming pool, cold beer and beautiful landscape awaits the riders)

Day 11

- Burnt Mountain
- Organ Pipes
- Doros Crater
- Divorce Pass
- Messum Crater
- Brandberg
- Brandberg White Lady Rest Camp (Yes, pub and pool awaits again)

Day 12

- Uis
- Spitzkoppe
- Usakos
- Kharibib
- Okahandja
- Windhoek and a little bit later - Joe's Beerhouse





a Wise man once said absolutely nothing...
 
The following users thanked this post: RobD, Chantal Burger

Offline Hardy de Kock

  • Chief cook and bottle washer
  • Vendors
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Thanked: 954 times
    • Specialised Adventures
The mysterious lone men of the Kaokoland

As one of the last remaining wilderness areas in Africa, it attracts hard-core travellers and explorers. It appeals to those who have already travelled the main tarmac arteries through the country and the myriad gravel tracks that branch off them like fibrous roots. Kaokoland, as this remote and inhospitable region (now part of the Kunene Region) is known historically, has always been the Wild West of Namibia. And for those self-sufficient and experienced 4◊4 travellers who venture further afield, itís a desert Eden of mysteries and marvels.

This pocket of wonders includes the strikingly beautiful Himba people, wizened desert elephants, robust rhinos and elusive desert lions. It is home to the remarkable life forms that have developed ingenious survival mechanisms over time to live with a minimal supply of water, like the intriguing and hardy welwitschia (considered a living fossil) and the handsome gemsbok. It also includes extraordinary sights like Epupa Falls where the crocodile-infested Kunene River roars over rugged rocks lined by a bevy of baobabs, the enigmatic fairy circles that look as if they could have been created by aliens, magnetic fields, poisonous euphorbias, termites, fungi Ė or fairies, the wild expanses of the Marienfluss and Hartmannís Valley as well as a section of the ancient Namib Desert, the Skeleton Coast, where many a ship came to grief. Thatís quite a list, and I could go onÖ

But, a new mystery has recently emerged, one that adds to the atmosphere of this fascinating desert wilderness: the Lone Men of Kaokoland. In the last year there have been more and more sightings of these nearly life-size rock sculptures, created with masterful artistry and a deep sense of place, giving the appearance that they have sprung from the earth. Made from the rock prevailing in the area, they blend in perfectly with their surroundings and take on different poses, catching you by surprise with their lifelike gait or posture. One figure sits on a hill top, surveying the arid landscape, another one Ė referred to as the Dapper Stapper Ė strolls across the stony plains carrying a bundle on the end of a stick like an old-time traveller, another appears to be deep in thought, while yet another strides across the rugged land with a strong sense of purpose. Each figure has an aluminium disc attached to it, with a number and a message as to where it is going. Although a sculpture numbered 27 has been seen (and I wonít divulge its whereabouts), only nine Lone Men have been found so far. One person claims to have found another five, but wonít say anything else. The sculptures have been spotted along the road on the routes between Puros in the south, Van Zylís Pass in the east, Otjinungua in the north and the Skeleton Coast Park in the west.

Several questions immediately spring to mind: who made these stone figures and why, how many are there and where are the others? But as with any good mystery, no-one knows. Or, if someone does, they arenít saying. Meanwhile, the Lone Men are gaining cult or celebrity status (well, by Kaokoland standards, that is). For some itís become an exciting treasure hunt (a bit like geocaching without the GPS, which would obviously spoil all the fun!), while others want to include them in their trip around western Kaokoland or plan their itinerary around them. I recently overheard a conversation among a group of bikers who are planning a bike ride to visit all the stone men. The mysterious Lone Men have also surreptitiously sneaked their way into the list of highlights and Ďmust-doísí for travellers visiting the Kaokoland and even the top 11 things to do in Namibia, according to 99FM. Exploring the country to find the Lone Men has found its way onto their list along with climbing Big Daddy at Sossusvlei and taking a drive through Etosha! OK, the adventure of seeking the Lone Men stands eleventh on the list, but, surprisingly, it is there.
People are calling the mysterious Lone Men, Art (with a capital A). A blog article entitled Forgotten Art Fuels Curiosity in an Unforgiving Desert refers to them as pieces of art in an open-air art gallery where the visitor has to alight from his vehicle and enter the gallery to experience them properly. One sculpture, in particular, is gaining appreciative attention in art circles.

There is no doubt that the creator of the Lone Men is an artist, and a sensitive one at that. He (or she) has created form and character with scant material, keeping the sculptures natural and authentic. The artist also appears to be environmentally aware and has not littered the landscape with sculptural clutter. The Lone Men are rather unobtrusively dotted through a vast area, simply-made and subtly placed.

As far as the locals are concerned, it is said that the Himba are completely unperturbed by the appearance or presence of the stone figures.
Legends and tales are now being generated, as happens with all great secrets, and are starting to float on the breeze. Rumour has it that the stone sculptures were once men whose love for the land was so great that they were transformed to stone and destined to be part of the unforgettable landscape forever. MaybeÖ
Several blogs, websites and Facebook pages mention the Lone Men and some ask travellers to send their images, so that all of them can be found in a common effort. Perhaps they will. Or, perhaps they wonít. After all, the delight, intrigue and allure of a good mystery is that it is never solved. Not so?

We know who the artist is and respect his wishes to keep the origin of the lone men a secret.

*This article was first published in the Travel News Namibia Autumn 2016 issue.
a Wise man once said absolutely nothing...
 
The following users thanked this post: Tom van Brits, Oubones, Chantal Burger, big oil, Annemien vdL

Offline Hardy de Kock

  • Chief cook and bottle washer
  • Vendors
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Thanked: 954 times
    • Specialised Adventures
The people of Namibia

About 2.2 million people share the vast spaces of Namibia, the country has one of the lowest population densities in the world with 1.5 people per square kilometre. It is thought that only about a quarter of Namibians live in urban areas, although this figure is certainly increasing as growing numbers of unemployed people leave their villages and farms.

The population of Namibia is not evenly distributed with about 60% of people living in the northern regions, while the southern and coastal areas are almost unpopulated. Namibia's population can be divided into (at least) 11 ethnic groups, the biggest group of which is the Owambo people. As a country Namibia is still trying to find a national identity, but each of the countries cultural groups has its own a rich heritage and traditions.

Due to the unfortunate apartheid history of Namibia the division of people into cultural or tribal groups is an extremely sensitive issue, and most people prefer to think of themselves as Namibians.

The population of Namibia can be divided into the following groups.

a Wise man once said absolutely nothing...
 
The following users thanked this post: Oubones, Chantal Burger, big oil

Offline mike gs

Thanks Hardy, some really beautiful pics and some lekker insights there. A trip with you has been pushed right to the top of the bucket list!

Sent from my SM-G980F using Tapatalk

Love life!
 
The following users thanked this post: Hardy de Kock, Chantal Burger

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 4,525
  • Thanked: 492 times
Thanks for the education, Hardy.
 
The following users thanked this post: Hardy de Kock

Offline Hardy de Kock

  • Chief cook and bottle washer
  • Vendors
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Northern Cape
  • Posts: 2,641
  • Thanked: 954 times
    • Specialised Adventures
Progress update:

All customer documents received, submitted and filed 6 weeks before the tour. This must be a new record. Thanks to all the clients :thumleft:

Customers
- Indemnities
- Out of country medical aid and travel insurance confirmations
- Namibian evacuation company confirmation of customer's medical aid acceptance
- Bike documents
- All other relevant cross border docs

Vehicles
- All vehicles serviced
- All equipment checked and tested

Lodging
- All camps, hotels and shuttles confirmed
- All the camp equipment checked 

The only thing outstanding is the collection of the customer bikes.
So looking forward to this tour.
Oh yes, before I forget - @Damaraland tells me Kaokoland is green...






« Last Edit: March 23, 2021, 11:51:29 am by Hardy de Kock »
a Wise man once said absolutely nothing...
 
The following users thanked this post: Oubones, Annemien vdL