Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: History of place names in Southern Africa  (Read 770 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TheBear

  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 11,198
  • Thanked: 857 times
  • Die Ruiter sal KilRoy regruk
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2021, 11:17:03 am »
That is incredible, when was it built?  Who built that magnificent looking structure, Americans?!?!

Probably build by a mixture of Dutch and Afrikaners.  Unlikely to be Americans.

Note:  I had to add the picture I took of this church during the 2016 Sasol Solar Challenge, which started the day's racing in front of the church.
#BB33 #BRADICAL!
#DB40 #DIVEBOMB!
#SO4 #FULLGAS!
 

Offline Dorsland

  • Grey hound
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 9,348
  • Thanked: 1146 times
  • Opsaal kerels!
    • Patriot Boerbokstoet
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2021, 12:05:46 pm »
Interestingly, the Hennie Steyn Railway Bridge is named after Hennie Steyn, brother of my paternal grandfather, Douw Gerbrand Steyn.  Oom Hennie was Secretary of Finance (Sekretaris van Finansies) in the Nationalist Government in 1940.  Their other brother, Oom Iddie Steyn, farmed on teh farm Springfontein, now under the waters of the Verwoerddam (Gariep dam).

(Edited to correct date)

Was die United Party nie aan bewind in ‘40 nie? Nationalist het in ‘48 gekom.  Smuts regering?  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Jan_Smuts_government

Daar was a CF Steyn. Minister van Justisie?

Jy is reg ja @KiLRoy.  Gelukkig kuier my pa, nou 90 jaar oud, vir 'n ruk hier.  Ek gaan by hom seker maak dan plaas ek dit hier. CF Steyn was nie familie gewees nie.
Beny 'n man sy spaarsaamheid en sy volharding en jy hoef hom nie sy onafhanklikheid te beny nie.

C.J. Langenhoven
 
The following users thanked this post: KiLRoy

Offline 0012

  • Double-oh-Tkwarf
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Suzuki DR650
    Location: Rest of Africa
  • Posts: 3,041
  • Thanked: 144 times
  • Race the rain. Ride the wind. Chase the sunset.
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #22 on: April 27, 2021, 12:46:29 pm »
sub   :sip:
->    TransAlp 650 - sold
:(    Yamaha XT1200Z - written off - R.I.P.
 

Offline JACOVV

  • The Mayor of Mopani
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS Adventure
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 4,462
  • Thanked: 98 times
  • East London
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #23 on: April 27, 2021, 01:01:34 pm »
 :sip:

Lekker leesstof.
Life is hard - even harder if you are stupid.
 
The following users thanked this post: Dorsland

Offline RobC

  • Stoepkakkertjie
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: Kawasaki KLR 650
    Location: Free State
  • Posts: 14,620
  • Thanked: 859 times
  • Bloemfontein
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #24 on: April 27, 2021, 05:09:20 pm »
Lekker thread. Graaf Reinet was 'n "Must visit" ten minste een keer 'n jaar vir my pa na hy afgetree het. Toe ek daar was op pad van MMC Karoo en die Vallei van verlatenheid besoek het het ek geweet hoekom... so paar uur se tuur oor daai uitsig maak mens se kop skoon.

En die kerk is na my mening die mooiste NG kerk in die hele wereld. :thumleft:
 

Online TrailBlazer

  • www.a-cut-above.co.za (Laser cutting & Engraving Services)
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: Honda XL650V Transalp
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 2,115
  • Thanked: 207 times
    • A-Cut-Above
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #25 on: April 27, 2021, 06:00:36 pm »
@Dorsland , vinnige hijack. Geniet jul kuier met jou pa. Hoe wens ek dat my pa nog gelewe het. Jy's bevoorreg.  :thumleft:
« Last Edit: April 27, 2021, 06:02:23 pm by TrailBlazer »
There are old riders, and bold riders, but no old, bold riders.

Do not ride faster than your guardian angel can fly!

Take only pictures. leave only footprints
 

Online KiLRoy

  • Kaptein Duiwel
  • Administrator
  • Gentleman Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 16,404
  • Thanked: 1205 times
  • Kaptein Duiwel - vriend van Beau Brummel
    • Wild Dog Adventure Riders
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2021, 08:08:13 am »
 
The following users thanked this post: big oil

Offline jhbdog

  • Pack Dog
  • **
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 180
  • Thanked: 26 times
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2021, 09:20:30 am »
I went to school in Potchefstroom and we had an amazing history teacher Mr Carnovan.
And I remember him telling us that in his opinion Potchefstroom was so named because as the Voortrekker wagons passed through the Mooi river the cooking pots that hung from the side of the wagon scooped up some water . So we had pot scep stroom .
So for me anyway that's the reason for the name .
 

Online KiLRoy

  • Kaptein Duiwel
  • Administrator
  • Gentleman Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 16,404
  • Thanked: 1205 times
  • Kaptein Duiwel - vriend van Beau Brummel
    • Wild Dog Adventure Riders
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #28 on: April 28, 2021, 09:36:07 am »
Nylstroom now Modimolle

In the 1860s, a group of Voortrekkers known as the Jerusalem Trekkers set off for the Holy Land. After discovering a wide river flowing northwards, they consulted the maps at the back of their Bibles and decided that it was the Nylrivier (Nile river).[3] They called the stream Nyl River and settled the town and called it Nylstroom in 1866.[4][5] After discovering what they believed to be a ruined pyramid, they were convinced that they had found the Nile. It was in fact, a natural hillock, known to the locals as Modimolle.[6] In March 1866, the district of Waterberg was created out of some of the districts of Rustenburg and Zoutpansberg with a landdrost established in Nylstroom.[7]:230 A Dutch Reformed Church was built in 1889 and is the oldest church in sub-saharan Africa north of Pretoria. It was also used as a hospital during the Second Boer War. The river is the Nyl River, a tributary of the Mogalakwena River.

The first South African railway line reached Nylstroom in 1898, connecting the town to Pretoria. During the Second Boer War, the British government operated a concentration camp in Nylstroom, where Boer women and children where interned as part of the Lord Kitchener's scorched earth policy. 544 of those interned at the camp died of various causes before it was closed upon the conclusion of the war in 1902. Strijdom Huis (Strijdom House) was the primary residence of the 6th Prime Minister of South Africa, JG Strijdom, and is situated in Modimolle.[8

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modimolle

Voortrekkers - not big on navigation  :biggrin:
 

Online KiLRoy

  • Kaptein Duiwel
  • Administrator
  • Gentleman Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 16,404
  • Thanked: 1205 times
  • Kaptein Duiwel - vriend van Beau Brummel
    • Wild Dog Adventure Riders
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #29 on: April 28, 2021, 09:43:37 am »
Bulhoek and the peculiar case of Enoch Mgijima

In 1912, Enoch Mgijima, a lay preacher and independent evangelist, broke away from the Wesleyan Methodist Church and joined the Church of God and Saints of Christ, a small church based in the United States of America. In November 1912, he began baptising his followers in the Black Kei River near his home in Ntabelanga. Towards the end of 1912, Mgijima predicted that the world would end on Christmas, after 30 days of rain. As a result of his predictions, his followers stopped working and came to join this communal living settlement. Over the years Mgijima's visions displayed a future full of violence. He was asked to renounce his visions by the leaders of the church as they could not condone the preaching of conflict and war, but Mgijima refused and was excommunicated. In 1914, the South African Church of God and Saints of Christ split, with one of the group following Enoch Mgijima, taking on the name of the "Israelites", in keeping with the Old Testament with which their beliefs aligned.[2]

Read more - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulhoek_massacre

https://www.sahistory.org.za/dated-event/nearly-200-people-are-killed-bulhoek-massacre-eastern-cape
 

Offline Dorsland

  • Grey hound
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 9,348
  • Thanked: 1146 times
  • Opsaal kerels!
    • Patriot Boerbokstoet
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #30 on: April 28, 2021, 09:47:04 am »
@Dorsland , vinnige hijack. Geniet jul kuier met jou pa. Hoe wens ek dat my pa nog gelewe het. Jy's bevoorreg.  :thumleft:

Baie dankie @TrailBlazer, inderdaad geseënd  :thumleft:
Beny 'n man sy spaarsaamheid en sy volharding en jy hoef hom nie sy onafhanklikheid te beny nie.

C.J. Langenhoven
 

Offline Dorsland

  • Grey hound
  • ****
  • Bike: Honda CRF-1000L Africa Twin
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 9,348
  • Thanked: 1146 times
  • Opsaal kerels!
    • Patriot Boerbokstoet
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #31 on: April 28, 2021, 09:54:13 am »
A bit of a long post and in Afrikaans but extremely interesting.  Dis goud soos die wat maak dat geskiedenis vir my so bitter bitter interessant is.

Julle kan gerus hier lees want julle dorpe word genoem. @Hinksding , @Wolzak , @grim101 , @Heimer , @Karoo Rider , @Matewis , @Tampan , @Nimmo @hardy de Kock , @Mof

@DUSTRIDERS ou Chris, jy wat die ganse wêreld se paaie uit jou kop uit ken, kan gerus ook hier lees.  :)

'n Interessantheid uit die pen van Daniel Lötter.
24-02-2017

WAAROM SOVEEL KAROODORPE ENGELSE NAME DRA.

Ek het dit nog altyd interessant gevind dat die dorpe van ‘n oorwegend Afrikaanssprekende landstreek, feitlik almal Engelse name het. Wanneer ‘n mens ‘n bietjie begin krap om te kyk waar die name vandaan kom, begin daar egter ‘n patroon ontwikkel.

Van die deurlopende patrone wat jy opmerk is dat feitlik al ons Karoodorpe hulle ontstaan tussen 1830 en 1870 het. Verreweg die meeste het ontstaan as gemeentes wat afgeskei het van die groter gemeente waarvan hulle oorspronklik deel was. Maar wat die mees opvallende is, is die feit dat die Britse Koloniale beleid van die tydperk sterk impak maak op die benaming, en dikwels herdoping, van die dorpe.

Die sterk beleid van Verengelsing wat posgevat het onder Lord Charles Somerset en sy opvolgers, en wat grootliks aanleiding gegee het tot die Groot Trek, het ‘n beslissende invloed. Dit was een van hierdie aksies wat ‘n veel groter invloed gehad het as wat lord Charles ooit vermoed het.

In ‘n poging om die aanbidding in die NG Kerk te verengels, voer Lord Charles ‘n klomp Skotse Methodiste in om as predikante te bedien in die nuutgestigte gemeentes. Wat hy nie in gedagte hou nie is dat hierdie hardekop Skotte een ding met die Afrikaners in gemeen het – hulle het nie ooghare vir die Engelse nie. Kort voor lank leer hulle dus Afrikaans/Hollands praat. Meer as een Karoodorp dra vandag nog hulle name.

Hier is so ‘n kort omskrywing van ‘n aantal dorpe se ontstaan, oorspronklike name en hoe die eietydse naam gegee is:

ABERDEEN
Die dorp se naam was oorspronklik Brakkefonteyn. Dit is herdoop na Aberdeen in 1858. Hier het die Skotse predikante se koms ook ‘n invloed, want Aberdeen in Skotland is die geboortestad van ds Andrew Murray, wat destyds predikant op Graaff Reinet was.

Van die ander dorpe wat vernoem is na hierdie Skotse predikante is:

FRASERBURG
…wat in 1851 aangelê is op die plaas Rietfontein en die naam van ds Colin Fraser van Beaufort Wes dra.

MURRAYSBURG
…waarvan die naam oorspronklik “Eenzaamheid” was. Die dorp is in 1856 herdoop om die naam van ds Andrew Murray snr te dra. Die “burg” kom nie uit die Duits nie, maar wel van die naam van ouderling Barend Burger. In die proklamasie van die dorp staan ‘n interessante vereiste: Elke dorpserf moes omhein word met ‘n kweperlaning. Daarom is Murraysburg vandag nog die kweperhoofstad van die wêreld – en het vir baie dekades die gehoorsaamste skoolseuns opgelewer!

PEARSTON
…het afgestig van die gemeente Somerset Oos in 1850. Hoewel die dorp aanvanklik “Rustenburg” genoem is, is dit in 1850 vernoem na ds John Pears van Somerset-Oos, self ook ‘n Skotse Methodis.

SUTHERLAND
…is een van die oudste dorpe in die Karoo. Dit is reeds in 1823 gestig en het aanvanklik die naam “Roggeveld” gedra. Dit is later herdoop om ds Henry Sutherland, ook ‘n Skotse Methodis, se naam te dra.

By ‘n ander Karoodorp het die godsdiens en die predikant ook ‘n rol gespeel in die naamsverandering wat plaasgevind het. CALVINIA is al in 1847 aangelê en het aanvanklik “Hantam” geheet. Dié naam kom van die Khoi-woord !Han=ami, wat beteken: Plek waar die rooi-uintjies groei. Die baie vrome ds Nicolaas Hofmeyr oortuig egter die Hantammers om in 1851 die dorp te herdoop na Calvinia, ter ere van die 16e eeuse Franse Godsdienshervormer, Johannes Calvyn. In daardie jare was die distrik van Calvinia een van die land se grootstes en tot 1994 se herverdeling van plaaslike owerhede was die distrik van Calvinia groter as die ganse Vrystaat!

By ander Karoodorpe het politiek ‘n rol gespeel om die dorpe Engelse name te laat kry. Britse goewerneurs en amptenare is dikwels vereer met dorpe wat na hulle vernoem is.

COLESBERG
Coleberg het ontstaan as sendingpos met die pragtige naam van “Toverberg” – na aanleiding van die vreemde koppie ‘n ent buite die dorp. Toe dit egter Munisipale status verkry word daar besluit om die dorp te vernoem Goewerneur Sir Lowry Cole.

CARNARVON is nog ‘n dorp wat sedert stigting in 1853 die mooi naam van “Schietfontein” gedra het. Spoedig word daar besluit om dit te vernoem na Lord Carnarvon, die Kaapse Koloniale Sekretaris wat dieselfde posisie beklee het vir ‘n rekordtyd van 59 jaar en 4 maande. Ek vermoed hy is dood voordat hy afgetree het!

VICTORIA-WES, wat as gemeente aangelê is in 1843, het sommer met die afskop besluit om die nuwe jong koningin Victoria te vereer deur die naam te verander van “Zeekoegat” na Victoria. In die vaste vertroue dat dit nog eenmaal ‘n groot en belangrike sentrum gaan word, neem hulle in ag dat Australië reeds ook ‘n “Victoria” het en om verwarring te voorkom vir die toekomstige geslagte, voeg hulle 1855 die “Wes” by.

Nog ‘n koninklike vernoeming het plaasgevind by een van die oudste Karoodorpe. Reeds sedert 1762 dra die dorp die naam van “Queekvalleij”. Met die koms van die Britte in 1803 word dit versigtig verander na “Albertsburg”. Pas nadat Victoria Wes egter besluit om die jong koningin te vereer, besluit die mense van Albertsburg om dan nou maar die laaste stap te neem en die koningin se man, prins Albert van Sakse Coburg te vereer. En daarom heet die dorp sedert 1845 PRINS ALBERT.

PHILIPSTOWN dra ook die naam van ‘n Britse goewerneur – sir Philip Wodehouse, wat dorpstigting in 1863 goedkeur.

LAINGSBURG het sekerlik een van die mooiste oorspronklike naam gehad: “Vischkuil-aan-de-Buffelsrivier”. Die naam word in die 1870’s verander na “Nassau” – een van die titels van die prins van Oranje. Toe die dorp egter in 1881 geproklameer word, (dit sou eers in 1904 ‘n Munisipaliteit word) word dit egter vernoem na die Koloniale Sekretaris vir Kroongronde, John Laing.
Twee interessante gevalle kom voor waar twee buurdorpe hulle name gekies het om twee Engelsmanne te vereer wat van hulle bestaan salig onbewus was, en wat ook nooit voet aan wal sou sit in hierdie suiderland nie.

BEAUFORT-WES sou aanvanklik vernoem word na Lord Charles Somerset. Daar was egter reeds ‘n Somerset-Oos en ‘n Somerset-Wes. Charlestown wou nie lekker klink nie. Op versoek van lord Charles vernoem hulle die dorp derhalwe na Sir Henry Somerset, die 5e Hertog van Beaufort – lord Charles se gesiene pa! Om verwarring met Port Beaufort en Fort Beaufort te voorkom, word die “wes” toe bygevoeg om aan te dui dat die plek nie in die Oostelike provinsie lê nie.

Op RICHMOND gebeur ‘n soortgelyke ding. Die begeerte is om die goewerneur, sir Peregrine Maitland, te vernoem. Maar daar bestaan al ‘n Maitland, sommer op die ou sir se voorstoep in die Kaap. Peregrine klink weer baie uitlands, en te verstane ook, want in Latyn beteken dit immers: “Man van ‘n ander land”. Sir Peregrine los die probleem self op: Noem dan maar die plek na my skoonpa, die Hertog van Richmond!

Die laaste Karoodorp wat sy naam verander om ‘n Britse Koloniale amptenaar te vereer vind so laat as 1919 – minder as 100 jaar gelede plaas. WILLISTON se naam was aanvanklik “Amandelboom” omdat Abraham Nel in 1768 ‘n amandelboom daar geplant het op die geboortedag van sy eerste seun. Dié boom het later ‘n reusagtige landmerk geword. Waarom daar dus in 1919 besluit word om Kolonel Hampden Willis te vernoem weet ons nie, veral aangesien hy net vir ‘n kort periode in 1883 in die Kaap rondgeloop het en toe koers gekies het Indië toe.

LOXTON is een dorp wat die naam van ‘n Engelsman dra wat niks met die kerk of die regering te doen het nie. Die oorspronklike naam was “Phezantefonteyn”. Toe dit in 1899 Munisipale status verkry word die naam verander na die naam van die eienaar van die plaas – AE Loxton.

OUDTSHOORN het ook besluit om die dorp, wat sedert stigting in 1838 “Hartbeestrivier” genoem is, se naam te verander na ‘n Koloniale politikus. Maar hier gebeur ‘n vreemde ding. Dit was reeds 1847 en die Britse bewind aan die Kaap was al byna 50 jaar oud. Nogtans word daar besluit om die naam van Baron Pieter van Rheede van Oudtshoorn te vereer. Baron van Oudtshoorn was ‘n Hollander wat in 1772 deur die VOC na die Kaap gestuur is om goewerneur te word.

Hy is onderweg op die skip oorlede en het nooit voet aan wal gesit nie. Nie-amptelik het Oudtshoorn ook die naam van “Velskoendorp” gedra omdat die snobistiese buurdorp, George, die inwoners van die Kannaland as takhare beskou het!

‘n Engelse dorpsbenaming van totaal ‘n ander aard gebeur in 1856 toe die twee dorpe, Hopedale en Lyons besluit om te verenig in een dorp. Die naam waarop daar besluit word is UNIONDALE

En dit laat een Karoodorp met ‘n Engelse naam waar Cupido en sy pyltjies die bepalende faktor was. Tydens die Napoleontiese oorloë en lord Wellington se veldtog in Spanje, is daar ‘n jong soldaat wat een oggend by ‘n Spaanse kasteel opdaag. Hy is net betyds om die 17 jarige Spaanse edelvrou, Juana María de los Dolores de León, te red uit die hande van die plunderende Britse soldate. Hoewel hulle nie mekaar se taal verstaan nie, is dit liefde met die eerste oogopslag. Brigadier Generaal Sir Harry Smith sou baie jare later goewerneur aan die Kaap word, en sy beeldskone Spaanse dona een van die gewildste goewerneursvroue in die geskiedenis. Daarom besluit “Elandsvlei” in 1862 om haar te vereer deur hulle dorp LADISMITH te noem – doelbewus gespel met ‘n “I” omdat Natal reeds ook ‘n dorp het wat na haar vernoem is – Ladysmith.

Dit laat nog heelwat Karoo dorpsname met geografiese oorsprong waar landmerke in die naam vermeld word, soos Middelpos, De Aar, Matjiesfontein en Drie Susters. ‘n Paar name van Afrikaanse oorsprong is daar ook: Merweville, Jansenville, Steytlerville, Nelspoort, Britstown, Vosburg, en Wagenaarskraal. Uit die natuur kom die name van Willowmore, Klaarstroom, Loeriesfontein, Noupoort en Leeu Gamka. Drie Karoodorpe deel hulle name met plekke in Europa: Middelburg, wat ‘n suster in Nederland het en Hanover wat weer ‘n familiestadjie in Duitsland het. En natuurlik Nieu Bethesda wat ‘n naam deel met ‘n plek in die Heilige Land wat in die Nuwe Testament vermeld word.

Maar dis anderdag se storie.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2021, 04:24:50 pm by Dorsland »
Beny 'n man sy spaarsaamheid en sy volharding en jy hoef hom nie sy onafhanklikheid te beny nie.

C.J. Langenhoven
 
The following users thanked this post: RobC, Hingsding

Offline Matewis

Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #32 on: April 28, 2021, 09:59:43 am »
Dankie oom Dors!! Baie lekker leesstof!!
“Don’t go where the path my lead…  Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail…” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
https://kettingsaag.wordpress.com/
https://witvosblog.wordpress.com/
 
The following users thanked this post: Dorsland

Offline punisher

  • Lolly Licker… i love to lick lollies
  • Grey hound
  • ****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 5,302
  • Thanked: 905 times
  • somph
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #33 on: April 28, 2021, 10:01:23 am »
 O0 :thumleft:
just wanna have fun , and ride ... and ....... ride
 
The following users thanked this post: Dorsland

Offline Heimer

  • Global Moderator
  • Bachelor Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 13,258
  • Thanked: 233 times
  • Kan nie ALZ onthou nie
    • Social Travel Digital solutions
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2021, 10:10:31 am »
Ek het daai gister raakgelees.

Bygesê die Queeckvallei plaas waar rondom die dorp onstaan het op Prince Albert, is deur ʼn de Beer aangelê..

Die uwe is mos ook ʼn de  Beer.

Ek is nou voorwaar terug op my roots.

Matriek getuigskrif 1979: ........... is 'n vriendelike seun met volop selfvertroue. Hy tree soms vreemd op. Die skool se beste wense vergesel hom.
 

Offline Wolzak

Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2021, 02:31:49 pm »
Nie-amptelik het Oudtshoorn ook die naam van “Velskoendorp” gedra omdat die snobistiese buurdorp, George, die inwoners van die Kannaland as takhare beskou het!
@Kaboef, kyk nou hier. :eek7:
Current Bikes
KTM 790 R Rally
Harley Davidson Deuce
 

Online Kaboef

  • Jedi Knight
  • Grey hound
  • ****
  • Bike: KTM 950 Adventure S
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 5,856
  • Thanked: 600 times
    • CFO Consult SA
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #36 on: April 28, 2021, 03:37:41 pm »
Oudtshoorn hou aan om mens te verras!

Fantastiese plek.
And Saint Attila raised the hand grenade up on high, saying, "O Lord, bless this thy hand grenade, that with it thou mayst blow thine enemies to tiny bits, in thy mercy."

www.cfoconsult.co.za
 

Offline big oil

  • R&P No posting
  • Race Dog
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1150GS Adventure
    Location: USA
  • Posts: 4,812
  • Thanked: 559 times
Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #37 on: April 28, 2021, 04:43:50 pm »
That is incredible, when was it built?  Who built that magnificent looking structure, Americans?!?!

Probably build by a mixture of Dutch and Afrikaners. Unlikely to be Americans.

Note:  I had to add the picture I took of this church during the 2016 Sasol Solar Challenge, which started the day's racing in front of the church.

Never would have thought either could build something so magnificent.  :pot:
If violent crime is to be curbed, it is only the intended victim who can do it.  The felon does not fear the police, judge, nor jury.  The felon must be taught to fear his victim.
 

Offline windswept

Re: History of place names in Southern Africa
« Reply #38 on: April 28, 2021, 08:28:26 pm »
That is incredible, when was it built?  Who built that magnificent looking structure, Americans?!?!

Probably build by a mixture of Dutch and Afrikaners. Unlikely to be Americans.

Note:  I had to add the picture I took of this church during the 2016 Sasol Solar Challenge, which started the day's racing in front of the church.

Never would have thought either could build something so magnificent.  :pot:

It's was built around the time you'll were killing off the Indians, that kept you blokes busy.  ::)
 
The following users thanked this post: RobC