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Author Topic: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil  (Read 48722 times)

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Offline Aquatic

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #400 on: November 16, 2010, 02:00:59 am »
Oh, I forgot to mention we won the trophy for the team with the best spirit of the rally: Three newbies, all finished with a fiat Doblo and a 1973 Kombi with a superman tied to the front of it! Anything is possible after all.
.


Now THAT'S what it's all about! If the other competitors saw you that way, you know you made an impression! A good one too.

As a spectator this type of award is much more memorable than winning the race with a huge budget and someone wiping your arse. Talented or not!

Respect and Congrats :thumleft:
The conundrum that is life...
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Offline Minora

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #401 on: November 16, 2010, 08:01:08 am »
Wow guys, thanks very much!


I think I am going to write that book, talking to an editor and looking at some publishers. I will let you know if I can get it published.




Een kopie vir my asseblief  :deal:
Ek weet nie wat hier aangaan nie, maar dis 'n moerse sukses!!!
 

Offline MoJo JoJo

Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #402 on: November 16, 2010, 11:24:18 am »
What an inspiration to so many !!

Thank you for sharing and may I be the first to say ..."where do I contribute to your Dakar 2012 Race" ?

Huge effort and we're proud of you !

Ian

i can second that, together we all can make this dream come true........
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Offline Footloose

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #403 on: November 16, 2010, 09:50:29 pm »
I am at a lost for words, I have enjoyed reading this and thanks for posting.

Keep us posted on the book and the Dakar 2012, willing to contribute.
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Offline ThinkMike

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #404 on: November 18, 2010, 03:01:14 pm »
Roll of Honour!!! :thumleft:

Well deserved Neil !!!!
Sorry Babe I am still riding.
 

Offline Would I?

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #405 on: November 18, 2010, 03:17:31 pm »
Hi Neil

I am already looking forward to the book!!!  :biggrin:
I also think you must package the talk and market it on the motivational circut like the crowds that have climbed mountains, swum the channel, walked to the south pole......

Also pre-sell limited edition signed copies of the book.
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Offline zetman

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #406 on: November 18, 2010, 05:57:55 pm »
Ja aangesien jy nou werkloos is kan jy ma net sowel boek en foto/cd uitbring en begin solank oefen vir die 2012 Dakar
Hou die Tyres op die Grondpad...
 

Offline BlueBull2007

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #407 on: November 18, 2010, 06:12:50 pm »
Ja aangesien jy nou werkloos is kan jy ma net sowel boek en foto/cd uitbring en begin solank oefen vir die 2012 Dakar

Exactamente! In fact I am going out for a desert ride in a couple of hours.
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Offline Rokie

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #408 on: November 18, 2010, 10:36:20 pm »
good to hear you are riding again.  :thumleft:
are you taking Mrs BlueBull's bike into the desert or is the Springbokkie in Lima?
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Offline BlueBull2007

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #409 on: November 18, 2010, 11:08:18 pm »
Yip, riding the mrs 450. The Springbokke is getting some TLC in San Francisco atm.
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Offline Berm_Rooster

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #410 on: November 19, 2010, 09:59:13 am »
ROH, finally!!!!

 :blob7: :blob6: :blob5: :blob3: :blob9:

 :hello2: :wav:
« Last Edit: November 19, 2010, 09:59:52 am by Berm_Rooster »
 

Offline Kreef

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #411 on: November 19, 2010, 10:47:55 am »
Hi Niel

Something that I have been wondering about is, how did you know that your preperation was actually preparing you for the race? What I mean is... did you train with guys who had previously done the race, or were you just training in any way, shape or form that you could and hoping that it would be applicable to the actual conditions that you would face?

You spend alot of time training on the MX course. I am assuming this was mostly for fitness. Then you also spend alot of time riding sand and doing hill climbs, but from your preperations thread, it does not seem that you did alot of extremely fast gravel road racing. (or maybe I just missed it)

What conditions did you face in the rally and were they what you expected? (aka, high speed sandy path and substandard gravel roads)

PS, again: Awesome effort man!!!
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Offline BOER!

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #412 on: November 19, 2010, 10:53:11 am »
ROH


 :thumleft: :thumleft:
My hart kom affie plaas, Waar die Wind en die Son en die Stilte my speelmaats was.

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Offline BlueBull2007

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #413 on: November 19, 2010, 06:15:56 pm »
Hi Niel

Something that I have been wondering about is, how did you know that your preperation was actually preparing you for the race? What I mean is... did you train with guys who had previously done the race, or were you just training in any way, shape or form that you could and hoping that it would be applicable to the actual conditions that you would face?

You spend alot of time training on the MX course. I am assuming this was mostly for fitness. Then you also spend alot of time riding sand and doing hill climbs, but from your preperations thread, it does not seem that you did alot of extremely fast gravel road racing. (or maybe I just missed it)

What conditions did you face in the rally and were they what you expected? (aka, high speed sandy path and substandard gravel roads)

PS, again: Awesome effort man!!!

Hey there Kreef,

I had no prior contact with anyone who had done the race before. As you may know most rallies including the Dakar have quite a lot of bad dirt roads to deal with, but also with a lot off-road, hard, technical stuff thrown in to wear you out. So when you talk about what is applicable I suppose any dirt road riding will be applicable. But you should also know its more than that, because trust me after 400km of hard riding you don't want to be worrying about your skills getting over a pile of boulders, or up a 0.8m step up or something like that.  So when you train for an event like you you HAVE TO focus on the technical stuff more than just blasting along a road. Building skills and confidence is critical to finishing.

My training was to build fitness, stamina and technique. The dune riding I thought would only really be applicable towards stamina and some riding skill turned out to be indispensable because there turned out to be a lot of really difficult sand riding between trees. A switch in my mind said "Okay this is just sand, not dunes". So there was nothing to be concerned about at all riding through this stuff, except keeping my pace up.

On my training routes I made sure I got some high-speed dirt road riding in as well, but practicing high speed dirt also means high risk of injury before the rally so you need to bear this in mind too and be more conservative than you would normally be. I don't mean ride slow, but its all relative. In the first three months of the six months of training I put a lot of really high speed stuff in. After that I started riding super fast a less and focussed more on technique and stamina. So I found the most difficult routes I could find and thrashed them until I could ride for 8-10 hours/day and still go out for dinner with the wife afterwards and have a normal conversation!  ;D So towrds the end, the only high speed training I really got was around about an hour every session, you know, on the roads connecting to the technical stuff.

I know it was quite different to what we got in the rally, but you have to ask yourself how many times do you need to practice a powerslide or braking to tap off on the speed before a corner?

The MX training was my last bit of training that I did. By then I was so nervous of breaking something, that I stuck strictly to the MX track, where there was even less chance of me meeting a car coming the other way on a road or hurting something coming off a dune crest. But it turned out this that was probably the most applicable training I could get at the end of the day, because it wasnt so much the fast stuff that I found hard, it was all of those super sharp corners. I did not realise how tight a rally can be. I thought it was all fast, flowing stuff, but what you never see much of on camera on the Dakar or on Sertoes is the amount of really tight, sharp turning one really has to do. Also dont forget that the slow, technical stuff is also generally not very photogenic, so you dont get to see that. Even on the Dakar,  you dont get to see the guys wrestling with their bikes in gullies that much because it's not easy to get to and the views are often restricted.

Training on an MX circuit helps big time with tight corners, and 2-4 hours on a circuit one is like riding 15 hours anywhere else, believe me.

The only thing I would have done differently with my training is maybe spent more time practicing ultra sharp turns, i.e. U-turning on a single track, or similar.

In conclusion then, I was pleasantly surprised that the riding was generally easier than my training and although I did not expect as much fast stuff, the technical training I got gave me the confidence to jump bridges at 140km/hr! Where I lost time was on the tight corners and more technical stuff. So I need to spend even more time practicing that.  Comparing myself to the other riders in our group, I was the fastest of the three of us generally, being much faster on the open bits; but possibly the slowest on the technical stuff. So that says something - That I need more time riding enduros and in the desert, and more time in particular riding ultratight stuff.
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Offline zetman

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #414 on: November 19, 2010, 09:40:22 pm »
What about mental training how do train to concentrate for so long in the rally an the tirednes and lack of sleep and tel us more about the roadbooks and trying to navigate while doing 140km/h
Hou die Tyres op die Grondpad...
 

Offline Soundboi

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #415 on: November 29, 2010, 08:29:11 pm »
Wow,wow, wow... I am humbled.
This is the best damned RR, no thing I have ever read.
Please keep us posted for 2012.
You are a great inspiration and I would like to wish you good luck with getting to the Dakar for 2012.

Hard Effin Core  :headbang:
But for me, it's like a night out with a porn star, every time I press that starter button. Schneller! Schneller! Tiefer! Ja, ich bin geil! Ich komme!  >:D

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Offline Fuzzy Muzzy

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #416 on: December 09, 2010, 04:07:22 pm »
I only stumbled on this rr yesterday and I am in so much crap at work cos for 2 days i have read every page.. what makes this rr so amazing is the way it was written with attention to detail and emotions it is almost like we experienced it with you.

RESPECT
Africa trip, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania & Moz rr http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=61231.0
 

Offline Walkaway

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #417 on: December 09, 2010, 04:09:10 pm »
Yes well done once again - Very Good. :biggrin:
What would life be like if we had no courage to attempt anything ?
 

Offline GStry

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #418 on: December 29, 2010, 02:18:20 pm »
ABSOLUTELY AMAZING.
I started getting an ulcer at the start of the first stage  :biggrin:, .
So far (page 9), no one has commented on your bike, it looks awesome.
Neil, any chance of a visit to Durban  :biggrin:
 
 
 

Offline BlueBull2007

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Re: Living the Dos Sertoes Dream: Racing 4,500km across Brazil
« Reply #419 on: December 29, 2010, 03:26:42 pm »
Neil, any chance of a visit to Durban  :biggrin: ?

After seeing some of the riding in KZN a trip to Durbs could definitely be on the cards next time I am in RSA.

What about mental training how do train to concentrate for so long in the rally an the tirednes and lack of sleep and tel us more about the roadbooks and trying to navigate while doing 140km/h

Sorry never saw your Q until now.

Mental training is all about confidence building. As you read I think I might have been lacking a bit in this area. I know that if I had better mechanical skills, the stress of something potentially going wrong on the bike that I could not fix would have been much less, for example.
The tiredness is another one I battled with on the long liaisons especially towards the end of the rally: I never realised it was possible to fall asleep riding, and I came close a couple of times! Not sure what you can really do about that, apart from practice having 2-3 hours sleep a night for a week or so and getting used to it. I bought a couple of bottle of water on the liaisons and every 15 minutes would spray some into my helmet, or pour some down the inside of my jacket. It has a great cooling effect in the wind and helps stave off drowsiness.

Navigation at 140km/h is always dodgey. You have a split second to look down at the roadbook and then remember headings, cautions, distances and landmarks. You also need to compare that to your ICO and if its off, correct the ICO to match the road book. If you focus too much on it you greatly increase the chances of having a rally ending and perhaps life-ending crash.  Bear in mind you are travelling at 40m/s (at 140km/hr) so in the second you take to look down and up again, and then react you have lost around 100m, including a margin too thin to stop in. So its case of memorizing the next two WP's and focusing more on the riding. It takes time to learn how to do it at speed; I was lucky enough to get 4 days of nav. Training in Nevada so it was a little easier. Even so it took me a coupe of days to get into it. Marking the road book well is critical to your safety; if you miss a double or triple caution because it was not highlighted properly can just as easily end your rally. This is also why I spent more time than most on my roadbooks every evening.
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Current bike: KTM 350 EXC   Previous bikes:  2010 WR450F, 2006 KTM450EXC,KTM 450RR, BMW800GS, KTM450EXC, BMW650 GS, BMW650 Dakar, and Honda XR250