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Offline White Rhino

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #120 on: February 23, 2011, 02:59:15 am »
Here is a a failry well spanned review of the XC .....

2011 Tiger 800 (XC)

We have had an opportunity to ride the new 2011 Triumph Tiger 800 and 800 XC in Spain's Pyrenees mountains, both on- and off-road.

Triumph has positioned the standard Tiger 800 to be an easy-to-ride motorcycle intended to compete with the Suzuki V-Strom 650, while the Tiger 800 XC goes head to head against the BMW F 800 GS.

On the street, the Triumph Tiger 800 a smooth power delivery, so high-tech wizardry such as traction control or engine mapping is unnecessary. Simply ride a gear high and you still have plenty of torque from the new three-cylinder engine to pull through out of corners.

When you choose to be aggressive, it is quick revving and ready to go. The transmission is precise with the ratios spaced perfectly, so the motor can be effectively exploited.

The Triumph Tiger 800 handles precisely, with the 19-inch front wheel leading the way. It's easy to transition the bike through chicanes, and turns can be initiated at the last moment so you can and fall-in to apex perfectly.

The Tiger's riding position is very comfortable, with a nice grip/seat/foot peg triangle. The seat can be easily adjustable from low to standard position, but all but the shortest legged riders will prefer the standard seating position.

The Nissin front brakes fully adequate with good feel and progression, though the performance does not equal that available from Brembo Monoblocs. The rear brake is very strong--perhaps too strong. Backing the rear in with the rear brake is easy, and precise inputs are rewarded.

The Pirelli Scorpions on the standard Tiger 800 worked well on the street, even in slick conditions, and there was plenty of warning when front tire would start to go.

The off-road ready Triumph Tiger 800 XC has great overall handling, coming in 473 pounds. This allows for a much lighter feel than most multi-cylinder adventure bikes, so you can turn with the front or the rear off-road. It's nimble and riding it is similar to riding an actual enduro bike.

This is nothing like a BMW R 1200 GS. On-road the XC's 21-inch front wheel means you have to turn in earlier than on the standard 800, and lock in your lean angle. The XC cannot hang with the standard Tiger 800 in fast, repeating paved switchbacks.

The 800cc triple has plenty of torque, so you will want to short shift it to retain traction. Rev it out and you'll quickly need to learn the fine art of power sliding. Fortunately, the XC is a willing and predictable slider.

Off-road, the motor can be used to keep the front end light, and as you roll off the throttle, the weight moves forward for effective braking. When riding below 1500 rpm, you'll need to cover the clutch and be ready to slip in, particularly when executing tight U-turns.

In the dirt, the Triumph Tiger 800 XC is as willing to loft its front tire as its street only brother. This helps avoid trail obstacles that appear unexpectedly.

With the 21-inch front knobby tires, sand is no problem--something that can't often be said about large adventure bikes. In loose rocky terrain, the 21-incher has a stable feel and good rollover capability.

Even with loose rocks filling the ruts of the fast line off-road, it was no problem to take the fast line instead of gingerly skirting around the obstacles like you may do with a 19-inch front. The 21-inch front wheel also comes to the rescue in ruts, though it's not much of an advantage if your ride hard-pack exclusively.

Although not adjustable, the front fork feel was good--Triumph's engineers got it right out of the box. The rear felt great, with no packing up or bouncing in the rougher stuff.

The rebound and compression were perfect. Large G-outs are soaked up with controlled unloading and the bike doesn't bounce the rider. Most importantly, the Triumph Tiger 800XC suspension is balanced front to back. IT is definitely class-leading suspension.

Triumph designed the Tiger 800 and Tiger 800 XC to be do-it-all bikes that could be both successful commuters and circumnavigators. Rather than work with an existing motor, Triumph developed an all-new powerplant specifically for this bike.

Manufacturers don't always talk about sales numbers, but Triumph has upped its initial estimate of 5,000 units sold in 2011 to a sales target of 7,500 bikes. When word gets out about how capable both of these Triumph Tiger 800 motorcycles are, those numbers may not be considered optimistic.

{Source: http://www.ultimatemotorcycling.com/2011-triumph-tiger-800-xc-first-ride}
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Offline GIDEON

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #121 on: February 24, 2011, 07:29:41 pm »
Nice also saw a nice article in BarkSA March


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Offline Pistonpete

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #122 on: February 24, 2011, 07:31:22 pm »
Nice also saw a nice article in BarkSA March
I doubt you will see a bad one...the journo's sometimes have to walk on eggs methinks!  :)
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Offline GIDEON

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #123 on: February 25, 2011, 09:02:31 am »
That I do believe, but if you read the between the lines the emotion you sometimes can see.
Reviews dont help at all. Get on the freaking thing and try it. However if you dont like what you see dont try it


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Offline GIDEON

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #124 on: February 25, 2011, 12:05:55 pm »
Looks like a ride report, still have to read it here it work its all but blank
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13618.aspx



Ok Get the feeling there is more to this
Follows the previous dates
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13621.aspx
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13625.aspx
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13626.aspx
« Last Edit: February 25, 2011, 01:25:46 pm by GIDEON »


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Offline Adventurer

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #125 on: February 25, 2011, 12:55:01 pm »
Looks like a ride report, still have to read it here it work its all but blank
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13618.aspx



Ok Get the feeling there is more to this
Follows the previous dates
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13621.aspx
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13625.aspx

My launch/ride report will be posted here shortly.....and I promise not to pull any punches...
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Offline whitedelight

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #126 on: February 25, 2011, 07:57:44 pm »
Looks like a ride report, still have to read it here it work its all but blank
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13618.aspx



Ok Get the feeling there is more to this
Follows the previous dates
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13621.aspx
http://www.triumph.co.uk/usa/News_13625.aspx

My launch/ride report will be posted here shortly.....and I promise not to pull any punches...

I am really looking forward to your report,it is important to get feedback from someone that has ridden a lot of different bikes and also to get a nice independant review.All our publications are far too kind to manufacturers when testing,whether it be bikes or cars.
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Offline GIDEON

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #127 on: March 07, 2011, 09:59:40 am »
Just some write-up with body from a new owner

The day may have been bitingly cold & full of mist as I headed up the M5, in stark contrast to Friday's glorious sun, but nothing was going to stop me picking up my new XC yesterday.

After a brief run-through some of the do's & don'ts it was time to take him home - the long way of course. Avoiding as much of the boring M5 as possible the next couple of hours were spent heading home via some of the more scenic routes with a quick spin over Dartmoor in what appeared to be sub-zero conditions. The final bit of running for the day was around a number of the hills and coastal roads in & around my home town.

So what did I think of it? Well what do you think??!!

In no particular order, here's a few things that spring to mind now that I'm sitting with my feet up safe in the knowledge that my old Tiger now has a sibling sat beside him in the garage.

No real negatives to speak of, not yet at least. The only 'issue' that I had probably has more to do with my riding style than anything else. I tend to ride with the balls or tips of my feet on the pegs. A few times I found my boot snagging on the rubber insert on the right peg when returning my foot to its normal position after a bit of rear braking. Not a problem really as it just caused the peg to fold back on it's spring very briefly.

Several owners have commented on the amount of buffeting from the standard screen. I've never really been too bothered by buffetting on any bike as I just see it as part of the overall biking experience. Maybe it's good for building-up the neck muscles? Anyway, at 6'3" I found the screen to be fine and would certainly not be looking for any kind of extension or alternative. I think there's less buffeting than on my '98 (Steamer) Tiger and maybe that's due to the screen being further away on the XC than my old bike, so doing a better job of deflecting the wind around me.

I just love the heated grips. As I've posted in another thread here today, I found the grips worked best for me when I was wearing my thinner summer gloves with no liner. More heat was able to get into my fingers more quickly. I prefer the feel that the thinner gloves give me but that always leads to very cold finger tips in the winter.

The Arrow pipe (baffle removed) sounds great but my pillion did find it quite a drone at some constant rev levels. It wasn't near so annoying to me but I could understand their point. I'll probably try it with the baffle back in on our next 2-up ride to get a comparison. The low level burble from the pipe when pottering around does sound really nice too. I didn't get any of the bigger pooping that some other owners have mentioned.

I think the lack of a main headlight switch is a mistake, especially since the headlights are always on, even before you've started the engine. I always ride with headlights on so it's not as though I need help in turning them on.

The suspension was quite hard over our local town roads. I've not checked the rear shock settings yet though so maybe a little tweaking will be needed there. The stiffness was not a problem but I'm comparing it to the relative softness of my Steamer.

Comfort for both me & my pillion was excellent. We'd been out for over 2 hours with no signs of numbness, either through our rear-ends or from the foot pegs.

I guess the final point has to be the handling. I know it's universally recognised that the handling is superb but I've had my Steamer for 12 years and it's taken just a tiny fraction of that time to be comfortable with the balance and control of the XC. It just feels 'right' and not at all like a big, tall 800cc might be expected to feel. Slow speed (5mph) balance behind a coach in traffic was a breeze. Leaning left-right through some twisties was effortless and reassuring. Confidence levels just seem to grow with each mile.

So after 2-1/2 hours of various riding I simply didn't want to park it in the garage, but it was time to see if the space I'd prepared for it to 'sleep' was suitable. With a central heating boiler next to him to keep him warm it was time to tuck him in!

Finally, the biggest problem I found was keeping the speed down. It was just too easy to stretch the limits. Even while thinking about the running-in recommendations, you just knew that it wanted to play harder.

(There's still a few accessories to be fitted at the 500 mile service but the attached were taken on my phone before the last leg homeward.)


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Offline See Duiwel

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #128 on: April 28, 2011, 10:46:06 pm »
Adv, ek sal graag jou report wil hoor. Almal vergelyk die T met die 800 en selfs die 1200GS. Hoe sal hy vergelyk met die 990?
Ek moet volg jaar bike koop vir Mevr. Dis nou tussen die twee 800's. Miskien oortuig ek haar nog vir 'n platter 990!!
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Offline White Rhino

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #129 on: May 04, 2011, 05:37:53 pm »
Nice one Gideon - enjoy your new bike :thumleft:

I have just completed a long Easter run (3,800kms), the first 1,200km was alongside an XC. We went up Sani and a little way into Lesotho. As well as some very rocky roads and some dirt tracks in Transkei.

The tar riding for the Triumph was symphony - glided around looking for the next corner. Beeg smile on my mates face.  :biggrin:

The rough dirt was a different story. The ride was a lot more shudder than you would like.

I rode it for about 20kms on some semi bad conditions and my take is, if you plan to do a lot of dirt, then I would have the shocks adjusted, if that's not possible I would change them.

The standard shocks may be better than the 800GS but it's not nearly as good as the upgraded shocks. And makes a big difference in terms of comfort and control.
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Nothing clears the head like a throttle twisted and the fresh air on the tip of the nose

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Offline GIDEON

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Re: New Triumph 800 test ride
« Reply #130 on: May 05, 2011, 08:05:29 am »
Thanks White Rhino but dont have it yet  >:D  :'(

Thanks for the replay.



BTW I truly suck with the shocks turms etc.
I know the rear shock can be set load or pre load What ever that means, I suspect its for 200kgs and riding alone.
Your talking about the front shocks?
« Last Edit: May 05, 2011, 08:18:09 am by GIDEON »


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