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Author Topic: Round the World - Do you have beer we are coming to visit?  (Read 100433 times)

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Offline Vlekkie

Hi Michnus
We are planning to do a trip in May to Lake Malawi and may be going through Botswana and Zaire.  I also have a Dakar. Was unleaded fuel ever a problem to obtain?
 

Offline michnus

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Hi Michnus
We are planning to do a trip in May to Lake Malawi and may be going through Botswana and Zaire.  I also have a Dakar. Was unleaded fuel ever a problem to obtain?

Hi Vlekkie, most places you will get unleaded up to Malawi, in fact most of Africa. But that said, the Dakar's can run on Camel piss very happily. :)
If you use leaded fuel your CAT would just not work anymore but that is absolutely not an issue and would do no harm to the bike. Your Green eco tjommies would not like you any more that's all.  :biggrin:
If you fit an after market exhaust you will remove the CAT with the old one so no worries then in any case.

Offline michnus

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Michnus where did you enter from Ethiopia into South Sudan? It seems you have missed the 'South' and the Dinka people which are Christians. They (obviously) do not see eye to eye with the Muslum Sudanese of North Sudan. Remember there is also a bit of grey area between the Noth and South where both North and Southern Sudanese live in harmony. The South Sudanese (which is mainly Dinka people from former African leader George Garang -amazing man but he died in heli crash) are very tall people and very tribal but Very aggressive nature. Even the woman are tall and the men or boys get inituated on a young age and cut in te face and the cary that 'family mark' (couple of scars and looks really visious!) The do not like 'short' people and the (like the Ethiopians) take a lot of care of their teeth by brushing it with a special plant/branch. Pure white healthy teeth. Their capital city is Juba in South Sudan as you enter from Kenya on the trans African Highway (although gravel av verry badly corrigated)

We lived their on the banks of the mighty White nile while demining and UN trying to disarm local citizans.

Love your report, I wonder when it will be moved to the nr1 spot in roll of honor!?

You and your wife have surely lived!

Keep on posting please

TBV, we entered Sudan at Metema. We would have loved to go see South Sudan. As you say they are quite different and we have heard many interesting stories. But at the time it was not even possible to enter South Sudan and that is part why we spend a bit more time in Ethiopia.

I will keep it coming, thanks for reading :)

Offline zetman

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 :biggrin: kom kom skryf jong jy is ver agter met julle ritverslag :ricky:

Update jy die piki_piki blog ook so nou en dan ???
Hou die Tyres op die Grondpad...
 

Offline Vlekkie

Hi Michnus
We are planning to do a trip in May to Lake Malawi and may be going through Botswana and Zaire.  I also have a Dakar. Was unleaded fuel ever a problem to obtain?

Hi Vlekkie, most places you will get unleaded up to Malawi, in fact most of Africa. But that said, the Dakar's can run on Camel piss very happily. :)
If you use leaded fuel your CAT would just not work anymore but that is absolutely not an issue and would do no harm to the bike. Your Green eco tjommies would not like you any more that's all.  :biggrin:
If you fit an after market exhaust you will remove the CAT with the old one so no worries then in any case.

Thank you Michnus!  Good to know!
 

Offline michnus

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:biggrin: kom kom skryf jong jy is ver agter met julle ritverslag :ricky:

Update jy die piki_piki blog ook so nou en dan ???


yes sal nou weer. ek het nou tyd om dit in te haal. 10000fotos net vir Afrika en nog so 5000 vir EU tot nou.  :lamer: :biggrin:

Probeer meer fotos hier sit as op blog.

Offline zetman

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Goeie werk man trots op jou
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Offline michnus

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We have lost so much time with waiting for spares we had to make up some distance through the northern part of Sudan on our way to Egypt. The days were still as hot as hell and we kept riding to early mornings and then again in late afternoons.


White is route through Sudan

Our route took us on the main road to Port Sudan which pass the Meroe pyramids. They say these pyramids are much older than the Egyptian pyramids. Itís not an expensive affair to visit the pyramids and the people in the small room even offered us some water and place to rest.


Meroe pyramids Sudan. Considered older than the Egyptian pyramids.



Some of the pyramids have been renovated and restored but in all honesty I think they made it worse. Our plan to wild camp was also flying out the window as we had to get to Wadi Halfa to catch the ferry in time. Even though the communication was difficult for some reason we understood each other and I kept in contact with our fixer in Wadi during the week.





We still had to cross two deserts on our way to Wadi. The heat was relenting, it really feels like somebody is blowing us with a hot air blower straight in the face. The one mistake I will not make again is to buy any black riding gear. Elsebieís beige jacket definitively was not as hot as my black little number.

As we rode I tried to image how Lawrence of Arabia traveled around. The adventure at the time must have been mind blowing. Dangerous, difficult to say the least. Today people take it in their stride. Busses, trucks, taxiís run the main roads bumper to bumper.


Offline michnus

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The clay has magical powers. Water is safe to drink and always cool and it never goes empty....struush promise!  :lol8:






fokol is growing wild!

Luckily the turn off to Adbarah took us off the main road and into the Bayudha desert towards Merowe, a town to the north west. Just outside Adbarah we were stopped at a makeshift road block. The friendly men ask us our route and then asked us if we are sure we want to take this route as it goes through the desert.


Dried up pumpkins blown around the desert like ping pong balls.

There would be no help if one of the bikes should break we might have to sit it out for quite some time before we would encounter people. For us there was nothing to think about, that was going to be the route and since it was still early morning we had enough time to make Merowe by midday.

Midway a roadside Ďoasisí popped up next to the road. The roof was roof constructed of poles and some palm leaves. As we got off our bikes a travelling salesman stopped. We got talking and he insisted on paying for our drinks. In the end we could only say thank you. The generosity of people in Sudan is beyond believe.


Yes in 1000m there is dedicated parking spot. And it looks the same as this place.

We rode into Merowi in the middle of the day and had to get out of the sun as soon as possible. On our way into town some policeman directed us to a house of a Nubian family. We could take rest there. That is how the Sudanese describe their siesta time to us. The Nubian people opened their homes to everybody. Their kind of hospitality is unrivalled. Always friendly and nothing is too much effort for them.

There are day beds under roof, made with ropes to allow for airflow. Late the afternoon we decided to head out for Dongola and make the best of the Ďcoolerí temperature.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2015, 09:50:32 am by michnus »
 

Offline TVB

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Ek moet saamstem, naas die Danakil Depression is daar seker nie n warmer plek as Noord Sudan nie. As daar n ligte bries is voel dit letterlik of warm lug deur jou trek. Dis ongemaklike hitte.
 

Offline Jaykay

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michnus, wat betaal jy vir black market petrol?
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Offline michnus

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Ek moet saamstem, naas die Danakil Depression is daar seker nie n warmer plek as Noord Sudan nie. As daar n ligte bries is voel dit letterlik of warm lug deur jou trek. Dis ongemaklike hitte.

Ek is nog baie spyt ons kon nie Danakil toe gaan nie. German toeris was geskieet daar en alle trips soon toe was verban. Sal eendag terug gaan. :)

Offline michnus

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michnus, wat betaal jy vir black market petrol?

Jaykay op daai tyd was daar n tekort aan pertol en moes ons R8liter betaal op swart mark. Maar dit was nie die issue nie. Jy kon net nie kry nie. So eenvoudig soos dit, daar was nie. Ons het maar gewag vir n dag en kanne in n tou gaan sit en volgende dag gaan haal jy weer. Daar is nou meer issues nie.

Offline Masai

Michnus,
Jy is ook maar fokken lui om te skryf
 

Offline TVB

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Michnus,
Jy is ook maar fokken lui om te skryf

Die man is inderdaad baie stil.... sal daarvan hou om verder te lees!
 

Offline EssBee

This RR has been absolutely amazing/awesome/captivating...call it what you want....sheeez! Thanks Michnus! It has also kept me out of my work for far far too long  ::).
 

Offline Wooly Bugger

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This is not life or death. It is an internet forum.
 

Offline XTRICK

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Great meeting up with you guys at Ais Ais last week. Just re-read your ride report and it was inspiring.
 

Offline michnus

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Okay, fok time to get the show on the road again. There's so much to update it is ridiculous. Next trip start in less than 2.5 months.  :deal:

Have I mentioned how hot it is in Sudan? Not your average Stellenbosch 42 now and then. It's more like Satan pit hot. The time between 10 and 2 when you pass out from heat. And then gets sort of better by 7 the evening when you drown in your own sweat when sleeping.
And no fucking beer!

Typical Nubian house. Nubian people are really cool and friendly folke. Unlike Egyptians


Time to "take rest"


5 Star rooms, wonder where were Charkey and whats his name was sleeping?


These most important commodity in Sudan is always for free


Nubian Nuri pyramids, Karima, Sudan, they say these are older than the Giza pyramids

Dongola is next to the Nile. We could smell water in the air as we came closer to town. The air got thicker as we road over the bridge and over the Nile into Dongola.

We headed to a popular hotel. Popular, not fancy. Itís an old place with very basic rooms. The place is clean enough and itís obvious that many backpackers and travellers stay there. As we got off our bikes, ready to just relax, the receptionist came over and told us we need to go to the police station to get permission to sleep in the town and at the hotel.

From all our travels this must have been the most bizarre and weirdest request. We were really not in the mood for such nonsensical bullshit. The guy arranged a Tuk-Tuk for us as his directions he gave me was gibberish and dodgy at best. The policeman took our passports and eventually came back with a paper that grant us the permission to stay the night.

Truly WTF! We headed back to the hotel for some drinks.



Dongola hotel rooms. Not bad but that water cooler sounds like a Folcker airplane taking off while running to keep the place cool.


Damn! We only eat bread, eggs and tomato sauce and then the tomato sauce pulls a porn stunt on me and cum on my face!  :biggrin:



The road to Wadi Halfa meander through the desert and follow the course of the Nile which flows out into Lake Nassar. All along the Nile the Nubian people farm and live in colourful settlements. I think a very special hike or bicycle trip would be to fly into Khartoum, take a bus or public transport to Dongola and then either hike, walk or ride a bicycle to Wadi Halfa following the Nile.

It is really safe and it is possible to camp anywhere next to the Nile or with Nubian families. It is easy to walk back to the main road and get a taxi or bus back to Khartoum. My only reservation is the lack of beers in Sudan.


Beautiful Nubian house next to the Nile. The Nubians will have you stay for free and feed you aswell. Really cool people.


« Last Edit: January 22, 2015, 03:03:22 pm by michnus »
 

Offline michnus

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Less than 200km before Wadi Halfa we rode past compounds with hundreds of people, trucks, pick-up vans next to the road with makeshift eateries. For the most there were no houses or shacks around. Only shallow dugouts in the ground covered with old torn apart sails flapping away in the midday heat. It was a perplexing sight.

Only later were we told it is people digging for gold. We were totally bowled over. The level of poverty and hope for a better life, living in the desert like rats in holes digging for a hope to find a morsel of gold. Good lord, itís a hard life.

Wadi Halfa what a groovy lekker town!

Sunset over Wadi Halfa

The sun was on itís way turning orange when we rode into Wadi Halfa. Mazar our local fixer told we do not have to worry he will find us as we got into town. On Tracks 4 Africa quite a few hotels are listed. The problem with that was that all of them are labelled hotels but most of them are in fact just rest houses. The locals call them hotels but they are not.

Mazar found us at one of these hotels and he duly directed us to the Kilopatra hotel. The place is dirt cheap and all the local travelers or overlanders spend their time here waiting for the ferry. There was a fan in the room with two well slept in beds. We left most of the stuff on the bikes. We were assured it would be safe, and it was.


Bikes and all the stuff on it is safe outside our humble hotel which was our home for 3 days. Mazar the only honest reliable and humane fixer we have ever met.


Loads of channels, Our private TV and a choice between Muslim prayers and Muslim prayers. Gourmet dining in our room.


Quick lesson: Use your hand to wipe your arse! If you use toilet paper wipe arse and throw in bin, just do not go in the afternoon the stench is vomit inducing.

For Westerners getting use to squat toilets is a funny affair. We are not use to squat like this. The other more nauseating thing is the showers and toilets are most of the times a one unit set up. Cleaning and the smell of you know what does not seems to bother locals as much as us. And then the custom is to not throw toilet paper in to the toilet. For one the sewerage pipes are not designed to handle paper waste.

Secondly they do not use toilet paper. There are small plastic watering cans around which the locals use to wash their hands after a visit to the loo. Toilet paper cost almost 7 times as much as normal packets of tissues.


Early evening the men watch TV outside, very festive and a social affair. Woman must not be seen, go cook or make a sandwich or something.


Intermission and we quickly take pray.


After TV time, it's time for tea and kak praat with the locals, and what's news on Al Jazeera.


Don't worry it is not just us Saffers getting screwed by MTN they rape the entire Africa.  :biggrin:

We did not waste time kicking off the bike boots and hit the dust roads for a night on the town. Wadi Halfa is small friendly vibey town with a very relaxed atmosphere. The people hang around outside after sunset when the air is cooler. They chatter like finches in a palm tree just before they go to sleep.


Our daily bread from our local hangout place. Burn like toxic waste and lava from the chillies and only luke warm Coke to wash it down. But still a great meal from our friendly new friends.

We dined on Shawarmas for less than 2USD for us both. Local tea vendor ladies dishes up the nicest spicy tasting tea with pleasing aromas.


Beds everywhere as "taking rest"is very important.



Lekker people, these old toppies were having very intellectual conversations with us while we sip on tea trying to fix the problems of the world. Breakfast was something ridiculous like R20 for us both. Eggs, fresh bread and tea


Ferry booking office signage. At least they tried not like the damn Egyptians.


I was convinced this was that Al Qaeda Osama Bin laden hangout pozzy. Looked really dodgy and all.


This guy eventually started giving us Coke for free because we supported him everyday. Cookies and condensed milk could stop any stomach bug. The town is pumping at night.

The damn Heidenau on the back of my bike was on itís way out. I think the heat of the last few days was causing the delamination. The entire tread was busy coming apart. Mazar had a KLR there with as side car which was abandoned by the owners, a South African couple. They were unable to secure the documents to cross into Egypt and it would have cost them more money that what the bike was worth.


Mazar the fixer at the Wadi halfa border

Mazar offered that we swap tyres as the one on the KLR were still good for some more mileage. The next day, Mazar, arranged all the necessary paper work for us to board the ferry and whatever documents that we had to have.

Sudan is a tough place to travel let alone live. No mainstream tourism which makes the country so special and a real adventure. We would love to go back even though there are no beers. The people of Sudan are really cool!


« Last Edit: March 23, 2015, 08:22:12 pm by michnus »