Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register

Author Topic: Round the World - Do you have beer we are coming to visit?  (Read 90164 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline charlw

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 950 Adventure
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 762
  • Thanked: 2 times
  • Bikes don't leak oil, they mark their territory.
Hi Michnus

I met another East London chap in Makumi working for Goodyear tyres. He is based in Mbeya. He explained how some of these cyclists obtain their fuel on the black market. They put a plastic container on the side of the road and place a rock on it. They wait for a truck to stop as this is the sign that they are willing to buy fuel from trucks.

Fuel is then siphoned from the fueltank of the truck. Everyone scores except the truck owner who is  wondering why these trucks are so heavy on fuel?!
The traveler sees what he sees.  The tourist sees what he has come to see.  ~G.K. Chesterton
 

Offline Cable Tie

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 990 Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 532
  • Thanked: 1 times
Quote
The small town of Nkatha...

Did you not perhaps visit Kande Beach? It is close to Nkatha Bay and was the high light destination for me in Malawi when we visited recently. Nice report Michnus, thanks for sharing.

My recent stay there was plagued by rowdy overlanders. I didn't like it. Nice setup but it is after all a overlander stop so be warned if you dislike them like I do don't go to Kande...
Why I love riding; Romans 1:20.
 

Offline Jacobsroodt

  • vendor
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 1090 Adventure R
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 4,048
  • Thanked: 83 times
  • Carpe Diem (in Afrikaans: Life's short, Ride hard)
    • West Coast Parts
Excellent! Subscribed.
BoosterPlug, LED Spots, Tool Tubes, RustStop, Kappa Screens, Top boxes, Tank Bags, ATG Gear - whatever works for me.
 

Offline krister

 :thumleft:  Wow!  Sal later klaar lees en kyk!  Dankie, Michnus!  :thumleft:
Previous Bikes: Suzuki TS50ER; Suzuki GS1000G; Kawasaki Z1000; Yamaha XT500; BMW F650GS; BMW R1150GS; BMW R1200GS Adventure; BMW R1200GS
 

Offline michnus

  • PikiPiki Overland
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS HP2
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 13,074
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • Pikipiki Overland
Charl have you seen on the main road in Zambia to Dar through the nature reserve they skim diesel next to the road in broad daylight it was like a filling station for diesel thieves, was if it's a normal thing.

Cable tie, where's your report? Are you back in SA?

On a different note I have to link the pictures from Smugmug.com, I know it takes time to load but to upload pics to the WD site makes for a super shitty report.

Offline Cable Tie

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 990 Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 532
  • Thanked: 1 times
Yes Michnus ek probeer myself dwing om te maak of ek bly is om weer deel van "society" te wees, maar dit gan maar moeilik....

Ek haal nog werk in maar sal seker in die volgende maand begin werk daaraan.

Ps: vir die wat nie weet nie, Michnus en sy Goose is legends! Enige iemand wat Oos Turkana sonder back-up in die somer doen    is!


Why I love riding; Romans 1:20.
 

Offline michnus

  • PikiPiki Overland
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS HP2
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 13,074
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • Pikipiki Overland
Ek hoor jou, ons is so naaaf gat dit is net nie waar nie. En ek praat nog gereeld met van die mense wat nog travel en dit maak dinge ook nie makiliker nie.

Baie mense het gese dit is n life changing experience en dinge sal moontlik nooit weer daarna die selfde wees nie. En dis wragtag waar. Maak n mens se oe oop vir wat regtig belangrik is in die lewe.

Offline charlw

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 950 Adventure
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 762
  • Thanked: 2 times
  • Bikes don't leak oil, they mark their territory.
Charl have you seen on the main road in Zambia to Dar through the nature reserve they skim diesel next to the road in broad daylight it was like a filling station for diesel thieves, was if it's a normal thing.



Saw it often in Tanzania, Michnus. Even north of Dar, on the way to Tanga.
The traveler sees what he sees.  The tourist sees what he has come to see.  ~G.K. Chesterton
 

Offline Cable Tie

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 990 Adventure
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 532
  • Thanked: 1 times
En toe?
Why I love riding; Romans 1:20.
 

Offline Charka

  • Member
  • **
  • Bike: KTM 640 Adventure
    Location: North West
  • Posts: 361
  • Dink vinnig-leef verwoed
Waneer kom die res..
Till the end of people
 

Offline michnus

  • PikiPiki Overland
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS HP2
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 13,074
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • Pikipiki Overland
Pole Pole.........Slowly Slowly is how Tanzanians do things.
« Reply #150 on: September 26, 2011, 06:47:25 pm »


TANZANIA

“Pole Pole” in Swahili means slowly slowly! That is how the laid back people of Tanzania live life in this east African country. Everywhere you go you hear Jambo, Jambo….hello hello with broad grins and inviting faces.

The moment we crossed the border into Tanzania it is as if we entered another continent, the people are doing things differently here. There's much more Pikipiki's running around doing taxi duty and the riders love their bikes, they dress them up with fake flowers and neon colour rattle can spray paint.



Let me go back to the border crossing between Malawi and Tanzania.

For one, up until now I considered all border officials as the lowest life form on earth, they are rude, power mongering officials with only one thing on their minds and that is to make life hell for anybody on the other side of the counter. Enter the Tanzanian border official - individuals with smiles, they have hearts and a sense of humour of some sort. Harold and myself looking at each other in disbelieve, Twilight zone or something?



On the AA border crossing schedule SA residents still needs a visa for Tanzania and it cost US$50 per person, that's a lot of beer money! We have heard that that might have changed and Harold inquired at the counter as we slide our passports over. Funny, as Tanzanians do not need visas when entering SA.


ROADS TAKE A HUGE BEATING WITH THE HEAVY TRUCKS AND TRAFFIC

Without ceremony the lady official was off with our passports into a room behind her, and came back without them. Wait there she said! After 20min another official with a straight face come calling us and instructed us to follow him into the room. There's 4 of them sitting and one talking on a cell.

Oh shit, we thought, what now! The older one ended his cell conversation and informed us that we are indeed correct there is a new directive out for SA passport holders, no visas needed for Tanzania anymore SA passport holders but because they do not have it on a stamped piece of paper they will stamp our passports and we must report to Immigration in Dar Es Salaam for them to make a decision whether we have to pay visa cost or not.


AROUND R30 FOR BEERS AND FOOD PER PERSON.

We were bowled over, Harold had the look of a man that was just bitched slapped with a 3 day old fish in the face, wet and nasty. This is not possible, border officials that are actually nice and gave our dollars back to us, there must be a catch, why would any border official do anything more than what is expected!?

We know moving around in Dar Es Salaam would be hell, so we said to the man we would actually rather pay for the visa than spend a day running around Dar standing in queues trying to convince another one of his border official species not to have to pay for a visa. No..no.. you go, we make you a favour he said!  Ya..riiiiight mate! We left looking very confused and baffled with our US$100 back in our pockets.


ROAD SIDE RESTAURANTS, THE BEST FOOD AND DIRT CHEAP. GOATMEAT WITH CHIAPATA'S

Little did we know this would come back at us!

Tanzania really is a freaky place. The people are much more colourful bunch than the previous African countries we have crossed. They are just as friendly and inviting, with big smiles and waves but their way of doing things are different.


PIKIPIKI'S EVERYWHERE WITH SPARES AND MECHANICS IN FULL SUPPLY.

All along the main road to Dar Es Salaam we past small villages. The road is lined with lodges and small road side bars in zebra colours and Safari names. They really embrace the safari and wildlife tourism spirit.



Everywhere there's people manufaturing beds, furniture, doors and anything else from wood. They are actually quite good at it and some of the offerings look like very good quality. Strange that South Africans can’t get such small industries up and running.


THIS TRUCK GETS A TOTAL ENGINE OVERHAUL NEXT TO THE SIDE OF THE ROAD, ONLY THE BLOCK WAS STILL IN THE TRUCK.

Tanzania also turned out to be the cheapest we have paid for accommodation on the entire trip. For a double room with shower, TV and what not, we paid the same as for camping in other countries! Beer cost R5-R7 for a beer and every locally owned lodge is affordable.

The moment you want to stay in a lodge owned by South Africans or Swiss or some Expat you will pay your ass off. Most travelling South Africans are to shit scared to stay in local lodges so they rather pay over inflated prices to stay at places where they can connect with a white face.


FARKING MAIN ROADS, I HATE THEM!

We also figured out some people verwar kak en kwaliteit. When a white expat lodge owner and that include any lodge run or owned by white Europeans or South Africans, say their lodges are eco-friendly you must know you will pay top dollar for a dump with showers with no water and a long drop. I know I generalise a bit, but there is reason for it.

When they use the word Sanctuary in their name it gets even worse, the protected mosquito's will drag you out your tent at night. When you order food and they will tell you it takes time to prepare good food, what they actually say is we do not have a chef and not much more than bread in the kitchen, we will go kill one of the neighbours old chickens.


EVERYBODY SELLING THE SAME STUFF

The first night in Tanzania we stopped at Makambago for petrol and by the time Harold and Linda got to the pump there was no more fuel left. We decided to look for a place to stay in the town, but like most small towns it is run down and looks dodgy to say the least.

While waiting for them to look for other stations I drove up their main road and saw a lodge that looked like a safe place to stay, it was behind big white walls.  In the end it turned out to be a very well looked after place, run by Sarafina Takunda a black Muslim lady. We paid R150 for the room including TV new bed and breakfast.


ABOUT R500 BUYS YOU THIS GROOVY KOOI

This was cheaper than camping rates! She was extremely helpful, arranging for us to eat at a nearby bar and the best from the place was its innocent presence that overwhelmed us. Even the next day at breakfast joking about all the Chinese materials that was used to build the place we thought we did not hear what she said about the price. To our surprise that is the going rate for local self-run lodges.


SOME EVEN OFFER SAUNAS

As with Angola over turning trucks are also a national sport and past time in Tanzania, we can only surmise that there’s none or very little training and qualification needed when applying for a license. Driving is SA is 100% safer than in the other Africans countries we have traveled, these are extremely dangerous drivers, going into the opposite lanes in blind corners, passing in the face of oncoming traffic and every other dangerous manoeuvre you can think off.


NATIONAL SPORT, OVER TURNING TRUCKS, TANZANIA IS ON THE OLYMPIC TEAM.

In Iringa we stopped for something to drink and I notice for the first time while checking the bikes for leaks or parts busy falling off, my bike’s radiator hoses are still swollen up after 15min standing and the other three bikes hoses are back to normal. Not more shit, I thought! But this can’t be good, so I swopped the radiator caps with Elsebie’s bike to try and figure out what is going on. 

That afternoon while looking for place to stay I notice water weeping out of the bleed hole, which is the bloody seals I have just replaced 1000km back in Malawi! I double check to make sure I fitted the seals correctly. I did, and now it is even more confusing because it means the bike is not releasing the pressure in the system after the bike was switched off. For some reason this have damaged the seal.


IRINGA AND THE SHIT HITS THE FAN AGAIN. THE DAKAR START TO PISS OUT WATER AGAIN FROM THE BLEEDHOLE

We were still 300km away from Dar Es Salaam and as we get further away from SA getting parts to us will become more of a challenge. My sense of humour is fast replaced with frustration.  I am constantly thinking what’s going to break next, or when I come around a bend seeing one of us next to the road the first thing going through my mind is what de hell has broken now. I can help myself with basic mechanics but I do not have the mechanical know how to deal with radiators or blown gasket type repairs.


DAR ES SALAAM AND IT'S SWELTERING HOT WITH HIGH HUMIDITY

I pretty much missed all the scenery and animals next to the road while passing through the national park on route to Dar, as I had to get miles behind me to Dar before the seal let go and lose all the water in the radiator. Strange, when I ride it does not seems to lose water, but as soon as the bike is parked 10min later it drips water from the water pump weep hole.


Offline Justin

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: Yamaha XT 660 Z
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 808
  • Bring it!
    • Sports Vision
Tanzania looks lekker!
Carpe diem!
 

Offline TeeJay

Aaahhh nice to read some more - I check here regularly for an update - thanks Michnus - please keep it coming - really enjoy reading about your travels.
Ja/Nee
 

Offline Avontier

  • Coitus reservatus
  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 690 Adventure
    Location: Limpopo
  • Posts: 1,526
  • Thanked: 10 times
Epic trip.  :thumleft: Malawi is next on my bucket list.
 

Offline michnus

  • PikiPiki Overland
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS HP2
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 13,074
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • Pikipiki Overland
Apologies for the late update guys, lately time is not my friend will update for Dar Es Salaam over the weekend.


Offline TeeJay

Apologies for the late update guys, lately time is not my friend will update for Dar Es Salaam over the weekend.



No worries - I'm sure all dogs appreciate the effort (I sure do).  :3some:
Ja/Nee
 

Offline Harry the Buffalo

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS Adventure
    Location: Limpopo
  • Posts: 2,292
  • I NEED Freedom!!To survive>>>>
Yeh :thumleft: Keep it comming :thumleft:
Having "GUTS" means being "SHIT" scared and still winding the throttle!!!
 

Offline charlw

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Bike: KTM 950 Adventure
    Location: Eastern Cape
  • Posts: 762
  • Thanked: 2 times
  • Bikes don't leak oil, they mark their territory.
I have also been waiting for your reports. Very interesting. Africa is unique.
The traveler sees what he sees.  The tourist sees what he has come to see.  ~G.K. Chesterton
 

Offline michnus

  • PikiPiki Overland
  • Bachelor Dog
  • *****
  • Bike: BMW R1200GS HP2
    Location: Other
  • Posts: 13,074
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • Pikipiki Overland
Dar es Salaam and saucy Zanzibar
« Reply #158 on: January 28, 2012, 06:17:11 pm »
It was late in the afternoon when we drove into Dar Es Salaam and headed straight for Mikadi beach resort. It was sweltering hot and the humidity hovered in the mod 80's. The resort is a overlanders spot and a bit run down but a good place to stay and it's right on the beach.

We had to plot our time and stay in Dar since I had to get new parts for the bike and wanted to visit Zanzibar. The first letdown was that we could not arrange to ferry the bikes across to Zanzibar. The bottom line was that the ferry was to expensive and the cargo ferries only traveled to Zanzibar and back once every fortnight.

Dar is a typical African city and a bit of a shit hole. There are a few nice spots and the vibe in the city are easy going and relaxed. There's many nice spots to dine and wine and the evenings are warm and windless.

We decided to take the ferry over to Zanzibar and spend 4 days romping around the island drinking beer and worship the sun god.


Mekadi Beach resort Dar Es Salaam


Linda's birthday and we quaff away on beer and wine.


Do I have to say more?




Offline LangKat

  • Member
  • **
  • Bike: BMW G650 X-challenge
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 248
I was hoping you would start adding posts to this again  :thumleft:



Do I have to say more? [/center]


A friend and I stayed at Mikadi for a few nights last year. Our flight arrived at 2am though so we didn't bother booking accommodation. We slept on the beach next to Mikadi and saw that sign the next morning!