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Author Topic: NAMIBIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN - Completed  (Read 12109 times)

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Ganjora

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2011, 06:14:50 am »
that Jimbo,
he's a tough ol' blighter...
the big bikes didn't last long,  eh.
 

Offline DeepBass9

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #21 on: September 23, 2011, 07:17:51 am »
Looks like an awesome trip. More!

Offline Gat Slag

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #22 on: September 23, 2011, 07:26:16 am »
 :happy1:
 

Offline Mark Hardy

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #23 on: September 23, 2011, 09:03:24 am »
Shit Damn Blast Fark....now I am really sorry I was not able to join.

Enjoying the report...brings back plenty memories of our december trip along that same route.  :thumleft:
 

Offline africanSky

Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #24 on: September 23, 2011, 09:20:37 am »
Keep it coming :thumleft:
 

Offline roxenz

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2011, 10:06:16 am »
Excellent stuff, keep it coming!

JIMBO always wears that tacky Wannabie jersey on a ride - there must be a story there?
 

Offline Malibu

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2011, 01:40:41 pm »
I think there is a story with all his gear... ;D
They call me Judy or Judes...

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Offline Stevie

Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2011, 01:29:50 pm »
:thumleft:

Sounded like the first section up to Bray suited dirt bikes more than DS bikes. It would be good to get a view / ride report from the "Big Boys"

Very lekker - look forward to the next installment ...


With all  respect due to the "Big Boys" - the open sections are their forte - the smaller, lighter  bikes just coped so much better with the tighter turns and rough terrain.
No disrespect intended to the talent of the riders (some of those boys are good), the group can only move as fast as the slowest rider (riding etiquette) and one unlucky slip or tumble will reduce the group's average speed.

It would be great to get comment on their opinion of the route to Bray.
 

Ganjora

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2011, 01:33:57 pm »
It would be great to get comment on their opinion of the route to Bray.

it would also be great to get some more of this RR
 

Offline ThomTom

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2011, 01:47:31 pm »
I have being sitting patiently under a tree near Bray since last Thursday, waiting for the trip to get going again.  Where are you??????
 

Offline alli

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #30 on: September 27, 2011, 03:59:12 pm »
DAMN!!!!
I wish I could have gone with, I love those Kalahari roads and the little dorpies that you get along the way.

Now Stevie, where's our fix :deal:

I'm living vicariously through this thread right now.
GONE INSANE.....BACK SOON

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Offline Stevie

Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #31 on: September 27, 2011, 10:50:48 pm »
Day 2 continues....


Jim's comment of the day...

The riding went well, but unfortunately I miss-read my own route schedule at Mc Cathy’s Rest and over shot the turn to the fence by 20 odd km.  Repeated failed attempts to rejoin the border fence resulted in an additional tiring 100km out of our way.  We had no choice but to return to Mc Cathy’s Rest to rejoin the border fence.

We had a fantastic ride on the roads from Bray to VanZyls Rus. It was hot dusty work but we settled into a good pace and kept a dust free gap between riders. The stops were few and far between - (Jim kind of means Hardcore when he says it). The stops were generally just for Jim to get a confirmation of co-ordinates and off he went again. Chris and I just looked at each other wondering if he ever gets tired.

Oh yes - Jim's rule of the day "if you don't stop in the shade, you get hot and sunburnt"

For guys that know the area - shade is pretty sparse - so Chris and I were always jockeying for a patch of shade, much to Jim's amusement.

I lost out on this patch....

 





We stopped at this spot after a particularly sandy section - beautiful, silent, peaceful





The road to Mc Carthy's Rest was great - a licquorice road - had all-sorts.
We crossed through one of the game parks and I had to play dodgems with a couple of Gemsbok.
The situation seemed unreal as I  watched the 2nd Gemsbok crossing left to right on a direct collision course with me. I had to grab a handful as things started happening very quickly. I was happy to let him pass, enjoying the puzzled looked he and his mate gave us as we accelerated away.

One particular cattle grid on the way out of the game park go the blood pumping as the bikes lifted  both wheels off the ground at around 90km/h  ;D

All too soon we rolled into Mc Carthy's Rest only to find the shop closed and no fuel available. A quick stop and nibble, re-check the route schedule and onward to.......????





Jim took off down the road, I looked at Chris  with a WTF????  look in my eye. Now I know Jim knows where we are going, but something don't look right. My Garmin is telling me a different story. Chris up and follows Jim, I up and follow Chris to this lekker spot...



Still the penny hasn't dropped...




Our navigator


Utilising maximum shade


We tried to follow a marked road on the GPS, but this ran on private land. We did turn in at one of the farm entrances and enquired directions from the local farm-workers. The folk were all very helpful but thoroughly intoxicated, each one trying to outdo the next with their idea of the best road to take. This enthusiasm led to some "huismoles" and the threat of a "klap" or two among the revellers.
The section to where they lived was sandy and soft, getting in with some momentum was tricky. Getting out with no momentum was wild.
We rode out onto the main roadwhich would take us to VanZyl's Rus but this would not have been in true Nabian spirit so the call was made to ride back to Mc Carthy's rest and pick up the border fence road.
Here we sacrificed time for fuel and rode like old ladies back to Mc Carthy's and on to the border road. Now this section of the land without fuel, is, well ... without fuel  :eek7:
A cunning plan is hatched en-route: as my bike is running only slightly lighter on fuel than Chris's, when I run out Jim will borrow some fuel from Chris - head on to Van Zyl's and then bring the much needed liquid for us all to replenish at VZR - cunning hey??
 





The border road at this point is a mixture of soft sand and hardpack with the odd Aardvark/ Warthog den dug in the middle of it. Not to mention the millions of holes dug by the cute little Meercats.

All was going well as we made pretty good time,  thoughts of low fuel not a priority as the speeds crept higher and higher along roads like this....

 

With all that speed and not much talent this  :o  jumped out ......











Ja Ja, I can hear all the armchair comments - "shoulda done this" "shoulda done that" - well shoot, then you shoulda been there. I guess I approached the corner doing 80, and probably managed to get down to 60, but in true inexerienced form I looked at the corner and not through it - twat.

Chris riding close behind thought I had saved it, but the fence flashing by 6 inches from my clutch lever and the fast approaching main dropper drawing my eye towards it the inevitable happened - snot, stof en haare - double twat.





I was shaken and stirred but apart from ripping off the side fuel pannier and the bicep protector off the chest guard, I got off with a stiff grazed shoulder and slight bruise on the left thigh.

Jim muttered something under his breath about done one corner done them all.....  :patch:
At this point we implemented our cunning plan to get fuel as  I was running on fumes and Chris was very low.
We checked our water and bade Jim a safe trip as he rode off into the late afternoon, only expecting to see him after the next sunrise.
Chris and I set off in good spirits, knowing that we did not have enough fuel to go too far and this was an adventure, we had food and water so all was well with the world. Our pace slowed a little as we kept our eyes peeled for a lekker place to camp.
Three gear changes later.... my clutch cable snapped  >:( - shoot, now what???
Nought to do but slow right down and find neutral before having to stop. Starting also quite easy, engage first gear and push the happy button grrr putt, grrr puttt, grrr vroom - piela  :thumleft:

We went through a couple of gates and were suprised to find Jim resting at one of the gates.

In Jim's own words
About 75 km from Van Zylsrus it became apparent we would all run out of fuel well before VZR unless we did something about it.  I offered to take 2l of fuel from each of Stevie and Chris and go alone to VZR for more fuel, and return probably the next day.  An abundance of farm gates in the next few kms slowed me to such an extent that Stevie and Chris caught me in their attempt to go as far as they could.  I was close to exhaustion at that point and decided to make camp there and then.  Stevie and Chris readily agreed.  We were about 50km from VZR and slept very well on the stones under the stars.


Chris's summary of the day
This was more challenging but a lot more fun. We did take one or two detours and found ourselves running out of petrol so we camped where we stood.
( he does say a bit more tomorrow  ;))

And sleep well we did, the setting was beautiful and harsh



Sunrise on Day 3 - the promise of adventure to come...










 




   
 

terminator1

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2011, 05:33:12 am »
subscribed!  :3some:
 

Offline Mark Hardy

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2011, 05:49:18 am »
more more more more ...please
 

Offline White Rhino

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #34 on: September 28, 2011, 05:53:30 am »
Reports like these, with incidences, always make for better reading. Enjoying the events as they unfold. :thumleft:
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Ganjora

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Re: NABIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #35 on: September 28, 2011, 06:32:25 am »
lucky,  stevie,  lucky...
more!!!
we want more!!!
 

Offline alli

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Re: NAMIBIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #36 on: September 28, 2011, 11:16:27 am »
This is making me sooo lus for an adventure ride. :ricky:

Thats what it's all about, not knowing what is around the next corner, great views and the wind in your helmet

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Offline africanSky

Re: NAMIBIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #37 on: September 28, 2011, 01:55:30 pm »
Hey Stevie - how long till the next dose?

It's amazing how much momentum a DS has when you need to scub off speed in a hurry!

Glad you were OK.
 

Offline Gunner53

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Re: NAMIBIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #38 on: September 28, 2011, 02:01:47 pm »
Eish looks like a great ride. Spoke with Jimbo yesterday. Really pissed now that I couldn't make it. Figure we might need to organize a re-run for the dawgs that didn't make this one.

keep the report coming
 

Offline Stevie

Re: NAMIBIAN HARDCORE VOLCANO RUN
« Reply #39 on: September 28, 2011, 11:29:12 pm »
Day 3 - what a great day....

It started well.....



Just after sunrise I had a took a walk in the very chilly morning air. It was crisp, clear and verrry cold. I was rewarded with watching a herd of Springbok doing what they do in the early morning. The Kalahari slowly waking to the sun's rays.
Some tough leathery things slower to rise than others  ;)



everyone doing what had to be done, taking care of all those pressing issues....





I will let Jim and Chris relay the start of day 3 - did I mention this was a great day??  :D

Jim
Day 3.
The only vehicle we have seen on the border fence turned up early manned by Frans and Jan.  As it chugged closer it began to unexpectedly sound like a petrol driven motor.  Chris hailed them down and sure enough, Frans agreed to part with 10l of regular petrol, straight out of the tank.  This was a welcome turn of events, but we were still 3 or 4 hours behind estimate.


Chris
The next morning a miracle arrived in the form of a bakkie that siphoned 10 litres of petrol for us to reach Van Zyls Rus. The funny thing was that that was the first of two vehicles that we encountered on our whole trip along the border fence, the other vehicle being the Police Border Patrol on the last day.

Words cannot describe the look on Frans' face first when they saw us and then when Chris asked him where we could buy petrol.
I think the offer to pay almost double sealed the deal and we were ready to rock n roll. This turn of events had Chris and I scrambling because we were planning a lazy morning, slow pack up and to give the bikes a once over.
(word of advice - when Jim is ready, he rides - so don't dawdle)

Our rescuers - Frans & Jan, good friendly helpful guys.



The ride to VZR was great, fast sand, rocks and hard pack. We had a funny incident on the way which had me chuckling in my helmet.
Jim was ahead just out of sight, Chris choosing to ride just out of my dust to keep an eye on me. I noticed a long stick lying in the road and moved to the left to make sure I didn't clip it and have it smack me or the bike. Chris went to the right. As I approached the stick seemed to move of its own accord - yep, slang - groot een. Now I did not have too much space to move and the bugger was already rising up hood spread. No time to panic, got lots of protective gear and lots of momentum. The snake flashed past my knee and I was past - no problem.
(I don't know if Jim had woken this big boy up, but he seemed rather grumpy - not like all the other nice Kalahari folks we had met.)
Now the irritable fellow turned his full attention to Chris  :o much to Chris's distress  :imaposer:
I did not see the events that followed but rely on Chris's rendition of the event.
With not enough space to stop and visions of the reptile's fangs firmly embedded in his leg, ankle buttock or hand, Chris amazed himself by vacating the left side of his bike and taking cover on the right - all at 90km/h!!! a feat not repeatable under normal conditions  :ricky:

The rest of the way to VZR was uneventful but very enjoyable.

Jim
There was some catching up to do.  A complete top up at VZR.  Fuel, water, engine oil, chain oil and frozen chops.
 

Chris
Soon we were in Van Zyls Rus filling up with petrol, water and essentials such as chops and boerewors. Strangely, the lady that was working at the shop was the Sister from the Clinic. We got chatting and she conveyed that it was most distressing that there were so many big bike riders especially in Winter that crashed on their roads because of not knowing how to ride the conditions and overloading just out of jolly

(Maybe the fallen riders hadn't quite perfected the snake avoidance technique!!! ;D)

Fuelled up, carrying at least 6 litres of water each and a mini polony under the belt we headed off towards the Molopo river bed. The road very rocky and with big piles of material for re-surfacing limiting riding surface. We headed into a stiff headwind - Chris and I chewing dust  for 20+ km's.

We turned off the main road onto a very rocky track that had plenty twists and turns forcing us to reduce speed and negotiate very carefully. This track would be great with an unladen bike.
Suddenly the road did a rollercoaster dip and dropped into the Molopo riverbed/floodplain. Steep rocks gave away to very loose sand and some interesting pathfinding on my part. Rather than fight to keep the bike on the track I did a sortie through the scrub and bushes until I found the road again.






The gates along this stretch wore us down, it was hot and gate after gate took it's toll on us. We took turns to open the gates but we lost our rhythm. (During the SA Bike Desert run these gates are all open and the guys can belt through)
This area was beautiful and the first section of road was great, we clipped along at a good pace. All too soon we were on the sand corrugations that required 90km/h minimum or things got just too hairy.
I was probably still a bit edgy after the previous day's off and laboured through the first 130km at just under 80km/h putting Chris under unnecessary strain behind me. We could not find a spot to re-fuel at the 100km mark and pushed on until this beautiful tree offered us some welcome relief.

 



Jim's comment on this stretch
We were soon in the big Molopo River bed, via Middle Pos border post and enjoying the 160 km of fast river bed and long – long sections of deep sand.  A good speed is required here, and it is sometimes difficult to actually stop.  We were in the habit of stopping 100km from re-fuel to empty fuel from back-pack into tank and to check on fuel consumption.  On this section we continued an additional 30 km before it was appropriate to stop.

Fortified with sustenance and H2O we hit the road again. Chris encouraging me to up my speed on the next stretch. The slow start in the sand minus clutch must have been quite entertaining to watch - the bike in full control with me hanging on until enough momentum handed crude navigational functions back to me.
I did crank it open as per Chris's request and had to occasionally back off as I ended up in Jim's dust. This last stretch to Molopo lodge was fast and bumpy - lots of fun. The last right hander before we hit the T-Junction on tar almost claimed me, but I managed to keep the rubber down. There is a little thorn tree right on the edge of the road that probably saved my bacon. Chris also had a near miss on this corner so I did not feel too bad about over-cooking it.

We filled up at Molopo Lodge, Chris and I both dunking our heads into the swimming pool - lekker. We were sorely dissapointed though - as we rode in the Lodge advertised Sprinkbok Pie  :drif:
unfortunately pies had to be baked and were the large family size - bummer.




As we were still well behind schedule, Jim cut out our Kalahari sand loop and we slabbed the 70km to Rietfontein - boring. Well not really as this gave us an opportunity to have a look around without having to concentrate too much on the road ahead.



The route we were meant to be on...20km in the distance - the Red Kalahari - lions and all!! :eek7:



We blitzed through Rietfontein, passed Haakskeenpan where the landspeed record attempt will take place and headed to the border post.
Unfortunately no pics of Haakskeenpan in the late afternoon, but it is a sight to behold. My first view of it took my breath away - will go back just to see it again.

We rolled into the clutches of border post officialdom as our bikes were scrutinised and checked - we most certainly fitted the profile of vehicle smugglers..... :imaposer:





Nabian roads - wow!!!!  :thumleft:

Formalities completed we gave the ponies their head on the fantastic roads - this was it Nabia - we were there, this was adventure.

1st camp in Nabia




Sunsets - love 'em - today was a big day, great.



Supper leftovers



Safest place for a cooking fire with all the dry grass in the area



Masterchef Nabia in correct attire





Moonrise



Jim's comment
By night fall we had just made it (they close at 16h30 S.A.T.) through the RSA / Namibian border, and camped on a farm 20 km inside Namibia.  A very comfy sleep in the soft sand.  Plenty stars, and full moon.

Chris and Jim opted to sleep on the banks of the dry river, I preferred the openess of the riverbed itself, the pebbles giving a level surface and being lower also some protection from the wind.
With a good meal under the belt and some very special Nabian tea, Chris and I were treated to some of Jim's adventure stories under a crystal clear night sky. The moon ultra bright as it completed it's trajectory through the night.

Chris had decided that he would tough it and use his tent as a groundsheet and sleep under the stars as Jim and I were doing. Stories of free roaming Kalahari Lions however had Chris re-think this strategy. All was well until a creature of the six legged variety inspected his nostrils and disturbed his slumber -  this saw him erecting his tent post haste.  :imaposer:

Day 4 - Sunrise



Fantastic treat - water that was lukewarm yesterday - chilled by the cold night air, ice cold and refreshing - revives the morning spirit.

Clearly these two needed a bucket of it...




This would be a day of profound statements and fashion.....