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Author Topic: Riding in traffic  (Read 1308 times)

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Offline Eisbein

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2007, 02:42:59 pm »


Nicely said :hello2:

Thanks - but you started it !  (the 'nicely said' bit ...)

:D :D
02/02/12 - RIP Glen - the Arrow of Elliot and the little man with the big heart that truly was larger than life.

You have touched us and left us better for having known you - even if it was only briefly.

For grabbing the moment and living the day It's been way too early that you were taken away
 

Offline Split

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2007, 08:19:46 pm »
Ysterman, let me say this:

If you did not look long enough to identify the risks you take and cause with a move in the traffic, you did not look long enough and the move is reckless. There is no excuse.

Ride Safe
 

D7

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2007, 08:39:52 pm »
this opinion is about to make me more unpopular with some members,  BUT:

1. imho,  when you get onto the bike,  you should understand that the 'cheques' you write WILL be cashed by your legs first,  and then the rest of your body.

2. You can NEVER EVER rely on anyone other than yourself to keep yourself safe.

3. Thus,  imho,  ANY accident in which you are involved is YOUR OWN fault - you should have been paying the proper attention and  taking the proper care.   Ultimately you should have been thinking about everyone,  'cause sure as hell none of them are thinking about you!!!

The only time you can be completely innocent is if a grand piano falls from the sky onto your head.....

and now,  feel free to shoot me down.....
« Last Edit: June 14, 2007, 08:43:59 pm by D7 »
 

Offline growweblaar

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #23 on: June 14, 2007, 08:47:50 pm »
I agree with you, D7. Except for the piano, you know what you're getting yourself into on a bike...


On a side topic:...


o   Your headlight looks no different to any other when I look in my mirrors.
o   The seconds I look in my mirror is not enough to identify that one headlight is moving at high speed or faster than the other.

This is something I often think about, both from a car and bike perspective: how much a quick glance in the mirror can actually tell you :-\. In fairly busy traffic, at night, especially on bends, it's almost impossible to see the difference between a vehicle somewhere behind you in your own lane, and the lane next to yours. It's just a sea of lights.

That's why I've always thought that some manner of driving lights is a good idea for a bike. Ideally, such lights would be a different colour, and the lateral spacing from your headlight would give you a sufficiently different frontal "signature" to cars and other bikes.
 

Offline Stephan

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2007, 09:00:13 pm »
D disagree with you to a certain extent.  I lane split every day and yes there are certain elements of behaviour on the part of the biker that should equate to taking due care in whatever you do, however taking a recent incident (this afternoon) as I was passing the cage, (4x4, Brakfontein interchange) he changed lanes, I just saw the cage veering towards me, as I looked at the driver I could see hom watching me. OK I swerved and accelerated past (safe) but this is not the first time this has happened to me.  Two of the recent accidents where I stopped were caused by cages changing lanes with the bike next to them.
My opinion is that riding too slow (same/slower speed than the cages) are just as dangerous as riding too fast. 
Hard reality does not often coincide with the people's wishes - Nelson Mandela
 

D7

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2007, 09:26:19 pm »
Stephan,  I hear you,  but lets think about this carefullly:

Very few people will actually look at you,  see you and then still try to turn over you.   I honestly believe that in the cases you refer to the biker was not directly next to the drivers window,  but possibly a little further back and thus in the cars blind spot.

Secondly:  when lane splitting,  the safest time to do so is when there is a car in the next lane (ie 2 cars next to each other with you slipping between).   they can see the car next to them,  and probably won't try and change lanes.

Thirdly: any time spent riding next to a moving vehicle is time you need to spend at the bike training school - cars are suprisingly similar to deers (in the US),  they move eraticaly  and normally in your way at the last second.

Fourthly:  as you climb on the bike you become invisible,  and those who actually do see you,  you need to be most cautious of.   The ones that see you will kill you on purpose,  the rest just do so out of negligence.

Remember - 4 wheels bad,  2 wheels good (it's an animal farm out there...)
« Last Edit: June 14, 2007, 09:29:11 pm by D7 »
 

Offline Avon

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #26 on: June 15, 2007, 07:32:45 am »
well, well, well, never in my wildest dreams did I think there are so many likeminded - let's call them mature - for lack of a better word - bikers in this country of ours. Granted, we seem to have some imported from all over (howzit Lawrence) that dares to compare riding in Europe and Cape Town to riding over here in Gauties >:D

OK, about Think Bike - Wihan, I agree with most of what you frown upon.......maybe Biker Think must also be part of the campaign?

Great thread, great forum and I'm proud to be counted amongst the pack - even though I ride that checkbook and image thing ;)

Avon.

ps. I have a few nice real wild dog Phodies somewhere - will dig them out sometime this weekend.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2007, 07:33:40 am by Avon »
"always try to improve the nut between the handlebar and seat."
 

Offline Ysterman

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #27 on: June 15, 2007, 07:43:55 am »
So I noticed this morning that there were a couple of punches thrown at me for my post yesterday.   :boxing: 

I may not agree with some of the ‚??personal‚?Ě remarks against me for just being honest, but if it all somehow helps to make our roads safer ‚?? I will take it and you can even through another punch. 

I believe that every situation has two sides to it and we need to understand both in order to resolve this issue.  Sometimes we're just too caught up in our own opinions and never entertain the idea that we could be wrong, therefore constructive criticism on a forum such as this, could be valuable to develop a solution that we can implement countrywide ‚?? after all, its about getting home safe ‚?? doesn‚??t matter how you travel.

So, to keep this a constructive thread, I will post later when I am a bit calmer, and in the mean time do some research on the topic.
 

Offline Hermanator

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #28 on: June 15, 2007, 09:01:00 am »
What cagers and weekend warriors see as irresponsible, is in fact mature riders making themselves safe. SAFE being the operative word!

My style in the traffic, and this becomes honed after many years, is to subconciously always be thinking of my safe cell and escape route. I only realised this when I did the Police Bike Safe course in England where you are taken on an escorted ride by ROSPA Advanced cyclists for an evaluation of your style and safety on the road. The comment came through that, if I was riding on my own, and when I had 'im behind me, I always made sure that both of us were in a safe place and had a route to escape.

When commuting, I'm alwas aware of exactly what cars and bikes are around me and where they are. Thinkng of the worst thing that any of them could do, I position myself in a position of maximum visibility. Always, I look at where and what I would do should one of these cagers do the stupidest thing.

This style has NOT stopped cagers looking at me and changing lanes, nor has it stopped them cutting in front of me with no indicators, and often is the case, I've ended up going down the hard-shoulder as an escape route under heaviy braking.

So, when you're lane-splitting, be aware of what's around you, even if they laugh at your head bobbing around to make sure you can see all that's going on. If the situation cahnges 100 times a minute, your escape route changes 100 times a minute - know your bike, the dimensions, your brakes and your tyres. Be assertive and drive to where you're going.

Lawrence
p.s. I had a brilliant day yesterday, life's always good when you're on a bike!
 

Offline Highlander

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #29 on: June 15, 2007, 09:12:24 am »


That's why I've always thought that some manner of driving lights is a good idea for a bike. Ideally, such lights would be a different colour, and the lateral spacing from your headlight would give you a sufficiently different frontal "signature" to cars and other bikes.
[/quote]


Well, my yellow "dust" light at the front helps for this. Can really see a difference since using it. Some people even pull their cars sideways quickly, maybe thinking its some sort of a emergency vehicle coming. Its still risky though all in all.
 

Offline CrazyPorra

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #30 on: June 15, 2007, 10:05:07 am »
Quite correct Hermanator, try and anticipate what the other road users next move is going to be, but from experience it becomes more difficult when daylight is not so good, during the day you can mostly anticipate when a cage driver is going to change lanes by watching his head movement in the car.

And a different colour light in the front does have its advantages but its still not 100% that u are going to be seen.
 

Offline Avon

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Re: Riding in traffic
« Reply #31 on: June 17, 2007, 05:39:09 pm »
Please welcome a fellow lane splitting rider - Just look at them teeth >:D >:D

http://lh5.google.com/image/avon.vosloo/RnVVJrnZkBI/AAAAAAAAAFE/RG_bwfakIG4/DSC_0734.JPG?imgmax=512

But methinks he better open those eyes when splitting lanes ;)
"always try to improve the nut between the handlebar and seat."