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Offline Heimer

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #180 on: May 09, 2012, 03:14:04 pm »
Taking pictures in Congo is a little more tricky as people don't like it when you flash a camera around.


Wait till you get to Nigeria  :patch: They expect payment or simply show aggression toward cameras..

Good luck, it is great to read about your progress
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 03:14:51 pm by Heimer »

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Offline Chrissie B

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #181 on: May 09, 2012, 04:00:57 pm »

Great to hear you're still doing fine.  Take care...
Chrissie B.
 

Offline Katundu

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #182 on: May 09, 2012, 04:43:42 pm »
 :thumleft:

Offline jorust

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #183 on: May 15, 2012, 10:51:01 pm »
*** Internet is SUPER slow here, so I hope to add more photos in my next update in Gabon --- Also my post exceeds the maximum length so will post over two posts ***

Congo ~ Further than ever before!!!

Total distance to date: ± 7300 km
Total falls: 5 (Last fall was in Angola - Lucira)
Total borders crossed: 3
Current Location: Pointe Noire (Congo)

Leaving Luanda was a very sad occasion. It also meant I would once again reach that fateful point that led to my previous expedition being cut short. Reaching N’zeto once again felt to me like I had finally completed a chapter in the book of my life and could now move on to go further than I have ever gone before.

I had four riders from the Motorcycle Club – “Amigos da Picada” from Luanda with me. They accompanied me all the way to Soyo where Dax and I boarded a boat to cross the great Congo River to Cabinda.

I got up at 4:30am to have a shower and pack my gear. The guys arrived at Jorge Almeida’s house (where I was staying for the last couple of days in Luanda) around 5:00am. The previous evening I had unpacked my bags and tried to take out anything I thought I might not need…to try and lighten my load. I did leave behind a bunch of stuff. It will stay with Jorge in Luanda until I return.

When we left Luanda it was still dark outside, but even this early in the morning the traffic had already started piling up and took some negotiating on dusty roads with trucks and cars swerving left and right to dodge deadly potholes. We stopped just outside of Luanda to fill up with fuel for the bikes and ourselves. Some coffee and snacks for the road ahead and then we headed for N’zeto.

Now for those of you who might not be aware: last year August my bicycle and gear was stolen just a few kilometers outside of N’zeto. The Governor of the Zaire Province; General Pedro Sebastião had come to my rescue, picked me up in a plane, sent two helicopters from Luanda to comb the area for the perpetrators and had the whole country up in arms. I spent two days staying with the Governor in M’banza Congo and then I was flown to Lobito, from where I made my way back to Johannesburg again. The Governor also made a generous donation towards helping me get back on the road again!

I had phoned the Governor before we left Luanda to notify him that I would be making my way to Soyo the next day, accompanied by four riders. He said he would phone me back within an hour. When he phoned back he told me that he would meet us in N’zeto!

Now I know what the road to N’zeto looks like, having cycled on this road. Just North of Luanda there is a quaint fishing village named Barra do Dande. Here I had stayed at a friend’s Lodge last time round right next to the Rio (River) Dande where it runs into the ocean. From Barra do Dande onwards you have a tarmac road for about 30 kilometers or so, until you reach a Police control point. Just beyond the control point you cross a little bridge and this is where the tarmac ends. The first thing I notice is the military presence next to the road. Military officers and men walking around with mine detecting units. They’re busy combing the area for landmines. And then a thought flashes through my mind: “I had camped wild here in the bush for two nights…possibly amongst some mines”. Yikes!!! I just smile, shake my head and thank my lucky stars.

I had been a bit nervous about the road ahead, particularly because I had the guys with me. I was worried that my riding skills might not be as advanced as theirs and I might hold them back. Especially when we started hitting thick sand! But within the first 10 kilometers I realized just how much my riding skills have improved!! The road up to N’zeto consists mainly of a combination of bad gravel tracks, some sandy patches and then corrugated gravel with loads of rocks.

I had found my rhythm on the bike and easily handled the bike through the more technical sections. It was hard work though and extremely tiring. After a couple of kilometers Rui’s bike (Morini Scrambler) had a radiator leak so we had to stop to fix it. I think we all welcomed the break. (No pun intended)
I had the weirdest feeling standing in the middle of the road, looking ahead at the wild landscape of Northern Angola with it’s huge trees…it’s not bushveld and it’s not quite jungle either…something in between…and thinking to myself: “I have CYCLED through this area on this road and I had slept WILD in the bush, possibly amongst some landmines”. Awesome! Hahaha.

Just before N’zeto  we reached yet another Police control point. Here we had to stop to wait for our Police Escort that would ride with us to N’zeto. We sat under a tree and had an ice-cold beer and grilled bananas. It was HOT and humid and we were absolutely covered in dust from head to toe! Carlos gave me a wet-wipe to wipe my face. It wasn’t recognizable as a wet-wipe when I had finished with it! LoL.

We waited for about half an hour and started to get a little impatient. We still had a long road ahead of us and couldn’t afford to lose so much time. So we told the Police officers that we would carry on and meet up with our escort on route. They were coming from N’zeto so we would definitely bump into them. And we did meet up with them about 10 kilometers ahead. From here we hit a stretch of road that allowed us to speed up a bit as there’s road construction taking place and parts of the road have been scraped and evened out. It felt good to be able to go a little faster than 40 km p/h for a change.

When we arrived in N’zeto, we were led to the Provincial office in town. I had only expected to see the Governor and his ever-present members of staff. Instead we were received by a television crew, Chief of police, a whole group of police officers and a big group of local people wearing T-shirts with the Zaire Province emblem on them.  And the Governor…with his ever-present members of staff.

Governor Pedro Sebastião: retired General of the Angolan Army, Governor of the Zaire province in Angola residing in the city that used to be the capital of the Congo Kingdom (M’banza Congo) and a personal friend of mine! I have a great deal of respect for this man. Not because of the titles he carries, but because of who he is. A gentle giant with a very big heart…just don’t mess with him! LoL.

The Governor welcomed me back to his province with a big hug and handed me an Angolan flag with a message from him written on it. We posed for the media for some photos and then went inside to his office where he handed me some flowers and an envelope. We then conducted interviews with different television channels present before leaving to go to lunch.

Lunch consisted of a spread of Langoustines, salad, fried bananas, chips, bread, rice and more. We sat chatting about my trip and the road ahead, about things past and all that had happened. The Governor asked me whether I had already organized for a boat to take me from Soyo to Cabinda? “No”, I replied. He picked up his phone and made a phone call, after which he told me: “It’s been organized”. When we got back to our bikes there were five yellow plastic bottles standing next to the bikes, filled with 20 liters of fuel each. They filled our bikes for us and then it was time for us to carry on. I greeted the Governor with another hug, and before leaving his embrace he said: “I will fly up to Soyo tomorrow to meet you there as well”. Wow.

Time had run out and we would not reach Soyo the same day. Lilio looked over to me and said: “You’re the boss, you decide”. So we opted to stay at Mukula, a little village next to the ocean on route. Just about 60 kilometers from N’zeto. The first 30 kilometers was on tarmac, until we turned off towards Soyo. The road just deteriorated from here on out. I was convinced that at some point my rear shock would give in. But it didn’t. Which is why I love my bike. She serves me so well!! But…Lilio’s bike’s rear shock gave in instead. (Honda Varadero)
We opted to sleep on the beach and had to make our way through some very thick beach sand to get there. It was a real struggle. The KTM 990 Adventure (Carlos’ bike) and the Morini Scrambler (Rui’s bike), had no problems. The heavier bikes like mine, Lilio and Lito’s (Honda Varadero) struggled a bit. My bike would just sink right into the sand. But it’s a powerful bike, even if she is just a 650. We managed to all pull our way through and finally stop for the night right on the beach just a few meters from the ocean.

Filthy and exhausted we started pitching our tents. Only three of us had tents so I gave my tent to two of the guys and took one of the one-man tents. The police prepared us some dinner (Pasta) and we washed ourselves out of two buckets. We then made ourselves comfortable on a bunch of mattresses that the beach patrol police had provided us with. Lying under the stars, looking up at the full moon. We had a bottle of Amarula…and I had something to celebrate!!! I had officially made it further than ever before!!! Woooohhooo. The mosquitoes were absolutely killing us, despite spraying and rubbing ourselves with anti-mosquito products. But we didn’t care much. We had food in our tummies and a safe place to sleep right under the open sky. Life’s good!

Next morning we were up at 06:00 am to make our way to Soyo. We stopped off at Mangue Grande for lunch. We had initially aimed to reach this town the previous day but the night had caught up with us, which is why we stopped in Mosaka. We still had police escort all the way from N’zeto and would have until Soyo. The Chief of police and local administrator welcomed us to the town. They took us to a place where we could have lunch, next to the beach. Rows and rows of fish lay on the tables at this mini food market. Cold drinks and beers, water…whatever you need, they have. I ate some fish with Cassava (Local food, I don’t quite know how to describe it. I think it is the root of a plant. When cooked it has this very dense consistency and it’s chewy. Doesn’t really taste like anything). One can find Cassava from Northern Angola all the way up the West African Coast.

We were all still pretty exhausted and spent about an hour and a half having lunch, relaxing a bit and having a few beers of course. Sitting amongst the guys, listening to them chatting away in their flamboyant way in Portuguese I realized something! I was starting to understand most of what they were saying! When my phone rang I even only spoke in Portuguese! The guys looked at me when I put the phone down and said: “Jo! You’re speaking Portuguese!!!”. Wahahahaha! Then they switched to slang! Hahaha.

The last 30 odd kilometers to Soyo consisted of a very sandy road. Thick sand and no avoiding it. Though I figured that I made my way through hectic beach sand the night before and just this morning so this should be a piece of cake. And indeed, although it was pretty hard work with the load I’m carrying, I didn’t have any problems! Up until then the road had been pretty flat, no huge ups or downs. Now it changed with lots of bends and ups and downs.

As we arrived in Soyo our Police escort that had been hanging around in the back (as to avoid them kicking up dust in our faces), moved to the front. For the last time in Angola the Police switched on their sirens and took in their place in front of me, chasing the cars off the road and bringing the entire town’s traffic to a stand still. They took us to the Kwanda Base which is based at the commercial port. Here they stopped in front of a pretty grand looking hotel. The Governor had arranged for us to stay here. As we stopped a car with the Governor’s member of staff pulled up and informed us that we had half and hour to unpack and have a shower before meeting the Governor for lunch. The boys were taken to their rooms on the one side of the hotel and I was directed to the other side of the hotel. I had my own suite for the night!!!  Another friend surprised me and stopped next to us. A friend from South Africa – Paul Buys who works in Soyo. He had brought us some energy drinks (much needed) and a chocolate from home for me! Sweet!

We met the Governor for lunch yet again, together with the administrator of Soyo. The Governor informed me that he had also spoken to the Governor of Cabinda to inform him of my arrival and I would be received by his people there. Two members of staff would accompany me on my boat ride to Cabinda and a Police boat would follow us all the way! They really did go all out this time to make sure nothing happened to me! After lunch we greeted the Governor for the last time and he told me that: “If you have any problems, anywhere…you just phone me”. And I’m sure that if push comes to shove and I think the situations calls for it, I will.

After lunch we took a ride on our bikes and met up with Basilio, a friend of the guys and also a club member. We then went to his house where we just relaxed for the rest of the day and drank some more beers and Amarula before heading back to the hotel. Paul met up with us at the hotel and we had all had a nightcap before turning in for the night.

Next morning I had to face the very sad reality of having to say goodbye to my friends. When I got to my bike Paul had left me a card with a beautiful message in it and another energy drink. This was it…I would now leave my Angola behind for new countries to be explored.

The Master of the Port met me at the hotel and said he’d accompany me and see to it that the bike makes it onto the boat safe and sound. It took some doing to put Dax on the boat. But there were loads of strong and fit men to handle this task for me. I just looked on, nervously and took photos. We then boarded the boat and were on our way to Cabinda!! A 4 hour ride by boat. (They said it would be a 3 hour ride but it was more like 4 hours). Once we were out at sea and I couldn’t see land anymore, I made myself comfortable (or as comfortable as I possibly could) on a couch and slept for most of the journey.



« Last Edit: May 17, 2012, 01:37:36 pm by jorust »

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Offline jorust

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #184 on: May 15, 2012, 10:52:18 pm »
I woke up just before we reached Cabinda. Only then was I informed that we would not be docking but would be transferred to smaller boats to be taken to land. “And my bike”? , I asked a little panic stricken. The guys will transfer the bike to the smaller boat as well, I was told. Mid sea…..Eeeeekkkkkk!!!
Two customs officers boarded the boat and wanted my passport. They then took my passport back with them to do all the necessary paperwork whilst we wait to be taken to land. We waited as they loaded all the people and their belongings into the smaller boats. We would be last in line.

Then came the moment when they had to transfer Dax into the smaller boat bobbing around in the water next to our boat. I was pretty calm and composed until the bike went over the brim to the lower, smaller boat. I panicked for a few seconds until I could see that Dax had made it safe and sound to the other side. Thank the biker gods!!! The rest of us then boarded and were taken to shore.

I was taken directly to the Police station to check in with the local authorities. Here a friend of a friend of mine from Angola, Julio, met up with me and took me to lunch. After I lunch I was taken to my hotel – Hotel Por do Sol. I unpacked my gear, had a shower and collapsed on the bed for a nap. It was already 18:00! The day had flown past. I woke up when my room telephone rang. “Good evening sir. There are some people waiting for you in reception. Can you please come down”. Sir…hehehe.

I reported to reception to meet the Vice Governor, Head of sport and other members of the sport ministry together with a translator. They welcomed me and informed me that I was now in the care of the Government of Cabinda. I thanked them for their hospitality and we planned the next day’s events. I would take a ride around town with a group of local riders and a television crew. Then I would be taken to the supermarket to do whatever shopping I need to do. I also told them that I needed to clean the bike and take care of some basic maintenance such as cleaning and lubing the chain and cleaning the air filter.

Congo lay ahead and I had NO idea what to expect! Julio would ride with me to Pointe Noire where I would be staying before heading to Gabon. The Police would also, once again (okay and really for the last time now), accompany me to the border. The road to the border is a very good tarmac road. We made it to the border in no time and I have to admit I had butterflies in my stomach knowing that I’m about to cross into the Republic of Congo! One always has these scary stories you’ve heard in the back of your head of an ‘uncivilized’ country. The roads are impassible and the people don’t like foreigners. I stood at the border, with a growing crowd gathering around me to look at the bike and shooting off comments in French. Getting through the border was easier than I had anticipated. I was on the other side in no time. This border crossing was also less chaotic than the Namibia/Angola border. The surroundings are very tropical. Dense jungle-like vegetation line either side of the road to Pointe Noire. Tarmac all the way. There are houses and huts next to the road all the way with people everywhere. People display their products for sale in front of their huts. Fruit, local drinks, bread etc.

I had initially planned on getting through Congo as quickly as possible.
Well I have now been here for nine days and it’s anything but uncivilized. A man named Patrick Lobo, based here in Pointe Noire contacted me via Facebook whilst I was in Cabinda asking me when I would arrive in Pointe Noire? He also gave me his contact details. When Julio and I arrived in town we stopped for lunch and I phoned Patrick to notify him that I had arrived. Turns out Patrick and Julio are very good friends and didn’t even know that I had contact with both of them! LoL.

A local family has taken me into their home. Fernando and Stephanie Lobo together with their children Jonathan, Jessica and Eluna. They will forever remain my family in Pointe Noire. They have been looking after me like I’m a piece of gold and they tend to my every need.

I started to fall ill last week Wednesday and came down with the flu. I spent about three days in bed. Just as I started getting better I realized that I now have a urinary tract infection. Stephanie took me to the hospital yesterday to see a doctor. They did some tests and the doctor told me to come back in two days time. He prescribed me some antibiotics. They will conduct more tests for the next three days seeing as the infection is rather severe and once we have the results I will know whether I need to change antibiotics or not.

I will probably spend another week here in Pointe Noire. I am now officially without a visa here in Congo as mine has expired. OOOPS. But…it’s not a problem. ☺ The officials know I am here and have said it’s not a problem, when I leave they will supply me with a stamp in my passport. Fabulous. I will also be able to get my visa for Nigeria here tomorrow! Wooohooo!
So in the meantime I rest as much as I can as I suspect I might need it for the road ahead.

On route to N'zeto


With the Governor and community members


The Gov and myself


It's late...and I'm tired!! The last stretch to the beach where we camped


Transferring of people and belongings mid-sea (Arriving at Cabinda)


Transferring bike to smaller boat at Cabinda














With the group in Cabinda


At the Congo border - Crowd seems pretty surprised wouldn't you say? LoL


The road into Congo from the border

First woman around Africa. Next up: Around the Americas. www.jorust.com
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Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting: "Holy shit!! What a ride!!
 

Offline Bring It On

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #185 on: May 15, 2012, 11:12:52 pm »
Wow Jo,... it is always so nice to see a new adition to this truly Awesome RR.

It makes for riviting reading & the way you write your updates, almost make one feel part of thi Gr8 adventure. Sure seems like you are having a really wonderful time & I can only wish you all the best for the rest of your jouney.

Enjoy every minute of it, my friend & please look after yourself & travel sefe. :thumleft: :thumleft:
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Offline Heimer

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #186 on: May 15, 2012, 11:23:01 pm »
Sterke meisie

Jy doen bleddie goed. Dis inspirerend hoe die mense na jou kyk.

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Offline White Rhino

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #187 on: May 16, 2012, 05:21:40 am »
Fantastic update Jo. Puts us at ease that you are so well cared for. The hospitality and support you have received to date has been astounding. I suspect that you travels will take you to a lot more unusual places and events as you travel further North. I hope that the UTI gets treated quickly, until such time lay off the spicy food and alchohol :biggrin:

Take care
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 10:08:32 am by White Rhino »
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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #188 on: May 16, 2012, 07:23:14 am »
awesome ... does my heart good to see the cameraderie of the bikers in the north. i have sat here rivetted since 05h30 and now 07h30 and i have missed my daily mundane wednesday chores like taking out the garbage, attending morning prayers and even abluting but these 10 pages have been worth every minute
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Offline jorust

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #189 on: May 16, 2012, 09:52:47 am »
Thanks guys.  :thumleft:  I'm really looking forward to hitting the road again soon. Sitting still for too long in one place doesn't do me a lot of good.

I have a question: There are small 'cracks' appearing in my rear tyre. Is this a cause for concern?

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Offline White Rhino

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #190 on: May 16, 2012, 10:14:24 am »
Thanks guys.  :thumleft:  I'm really looking forward to hitting the road again soon. Sitting still for too long in one place doesn't do me a lot of good.

I have a question: There are small 'cracks' appearing in my rear tyre. Is this a cause for concern?


You've got tubed tyres, so no immediate failure likely.

If I recall you put Heidies on - I have seen that on some tyres. It does raise concern. Adventurer may be able to shed some light.
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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #191 on: May 16, 2012, 10:27:33 am »
Thanks guys.  :thumleft:  I'm really looking forward to hitting the road again soon. Sitting still for too long in one place doesn't do me a lot of good.

I have a question: There are small 'cracks' appearing in my rear tyre. Is this a cause for concern?


Jo,... I have had a Heidie K60 on before & am presently riding a Mitas E-07. Both tyres developed small cracks, but never failed. As far as I know & what was explained to me, it is often caused by riding with low inflated tyres for long stretches on tar.

Like I said, I have never had a tyre fail on me,.... But please just keep an eye on it. If it gets a lot worse,.... IMHO, then rather replace it.
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Offline jorust

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #192 on: May 16, 2012, 10:45:12 am »
I'll just keep an eye on it. As you can see from the photos I still have quite a bit of tread on the tires and am hoping they'll last me for another while. Right now mileage on the tires = ±9000 km.

First woman around Africa. Next up: Around the Americas. www.jorust.com
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Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting: "Holy shit!! What a ride!!
 

Offline jorust

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #193 on: May 16, 2012, 10:50:50 am »
*** Just got my new Congo visa. LoL. Took all of 5 minutes. Yay. At least I'm legal again... :thumleft: ***

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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #194 on: May 16, 2012, 10:53:39 am »
Heng Jo, jy het nie 'n tekort aan vriende nie!! :)
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Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #195 on: May 16, 2012, 10:58:55 am »
It's not what you know...it's who you know.   :thumleft:
Nee heng...die feit dat ek alewig net die regte mense ontmoet is ook net aan my lucky sterre te dank. LoL

First woman around Africa. Next up: Around the Americas. www.jorust.com
Website: www.jorust.com. Ride Report: http://www.wilddog.za.net/forum/index.php?topic=95770.0

Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting: "Holy shit!! What a ride!!
 

Offline Dusty

  • Senior Member
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  • Bike: BMW F650GS / Dakar
    Location: Western Cape
  • Posts: 602
Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #196 on: May 16, 2012, 11:18:59 am »
Thanks for the fantastic update  :thumleft: 

Cranberry juice...if you could find some... is meant to be good for UTI

Hope you feel better soon   :ricky: 
If you don't know where you're going, any road will take you there.
 

Offline slicknick

  • Senior Member
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  • Bike: Harley Davidson (all models)
    Location: Gauteng
  • Posts: 567
  • When in doubt, flat out!!
Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #197 on: May 16, 2012, 12:51:09 pm »
Great stuff Jo, dis great om te sien hoe baie vriendelike mense daar  in Afrika is. Ek dink jy behoort Congo baie te geniet. Dis n mooi land. Pas jouself op en onthou ABC (attitude, balance, commitment) :thumleft:
The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who, in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee
 

Offline schalk vd merwe

Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #198 on: May 16, 2012, 02:40:30 pm »
Hi Jolandie, ek glo jy gaan die trip deurmaak. As 'n mens glo jy gaan dit maak dan sal jy. Iemand wat ek ken het ook met 'n 650 Dakar deur Afrika en Europa gery en sy bike het toe al 160 000km op gehad, so ek dink jy het die regte bike wat betroubaar is. Miskien net 'n bietjie advies, n' mens raak altyd lus vir Suid Afrikaanse kos in Afrika, as jy Shoprite Google kan jy sien waar hulle winkels is in baie van die groot stede en die selfde vleis en ander voorraad as in RSA daar kry. Ons het dit gedoen en het altyd lekker geeët. Ek volg nou jou trip en sal jou op die grens kom ontmoet volgende jaar as jy terug kom. Sterkte en al die WD ouens dink jy is 'n yster. Groete Schalk JHB.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 02:46:07 pm by schalk vd merwe »
1/The only way to get experience is to get experience-Schalk                
2/Ride Reports>Long Tours>Africa Tour To The Equator And Back In 40 Days
3/A stranger is just a friend you have not met yet
4/Whatever you vividly imagine, ardently desire, sincerely believe in and enthusiastically act upon must come to past-Paul J Mayer
5/Use the rocks in the your way to build stepping stones-Herman Zapp
 

Offline schalk vd merwe

Re: Right Around Africa
« Reply #199 on: May 16, 2012, 02:44:31 pm »
I'll just keep an eye on it. As you can see from the photos I still have quite a bit of tread on the tires and am hoping they'll last me for another while. Right now mileage on the tires = ±9000 km.

Ons het 13 350km op 'n stel gekry, groete
1/The only way to get experience is to get experience-Schalk                
2/Ride Reports>Long Tours>Africa Tour To The Equator And Back In 40 Days
3/A stranger is just a friend you have not met yet
4/Whatever you vividly imagine, ardently desire, sincerely believe in and enthusiastically act upon must come to past-Paul J Mayer
5/Use the rocks in the your way to build stepping stones-Herman Zapp