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Offline Pleco

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #180 on: December 04, 2014, 09:22:38 am »

PS. Andrew do you give sand riding lessons? :biggrin:

I have, not for a while though.

But have a read through this that I wrote, it may be of some help;

Sand riding, it's not about the sand (so much)

A chat with Andrew at a Parklands sand pit, changed my view of sand riding. His one handed video clip on youtube shows how little effort it should be.

But talking and reading and listening will only get you so far. Riding and falling a bit is the way to go put it all in practice. :ricky:
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Offline Snafu

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #181 on: December 04, 2014, 08:39:47 pm »
Alhtough I did see John manfully resisting the urge to remind us that it was a rule that no alcohol be present. ((that rule is going to have to be seen to next year)Secretly I am sure he needed a good few glasses too!).

This will be kak news, but the no alcohol thing is MSAs rule, not Amagezas.

Big question here

Your time stops, you are not racing anymore
Is there a parc ferme ?

Maybe it is a new rule, but we always had something at night during a multi day event, but maybe the parc ferme plays a role
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Offline BlueBull2007

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #182 on: December 04, 2014, 10:57:48 pm »
Hope Kamanya does not mind me answering.

No there was no park ferme. Strictly speaking park ferme is a restricted an area the bikes are kept where only riders are allowed and normally not for more than 10 minutes to maybe change a filter or whatever they might have with them. After that the bikes are essentially frozen from any maintenance, support crews and or riders until 5 minutes before the riders start time the next day. Even then the riders are only allowedinto park ferme 5 minutes before they leave, and then its penalty time if they are late or delayed.

This is what happens on a Dakar marathón stage. Guys come in, park the bikes and walk away to rest. No one gets to touch the bike until the following day apart from the 10 minutes on arrival (which is timed).

Park ferme has nothing to do with timing, except pilot will have pain of severe penalties if they try and breach it.

ON the special stages you are timed, and some of the guys were riding the special after dark on Day 3 for sure, so there is night riding if you have an issue out there.

I would expect a lot more riding in the dark, hopefully only on the liaisons next year when the days will be a lot shorter. I suppose when we start to get rest days on the Amageza one might have a 600-700km special before that, and as they do on Dakar, I would think the organization of Amageza would allow guys to come in up to 18h00s on the rest day (ie.e 36 hours to complete that stage to stay in the race).  Of course there would be no rest day for anyone doing that. Unthinkable...but it happens every year on the Dakar.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2014, 10:59:49 pm by BlueBull2007 »
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Offline Snafu

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #183 on: December 05, 2014, 10:10:21 am »
Quote
Park ferme has nothing to do with timing, except pilot will have pain of severe penalties if they try and breach it.

Parc ferme basically stops the clock/race

Question about having a beer at night, so I assume if your bike is in Parc Ferme, you can go have a beer :)
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Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #184 on: December 05, 2014, 02:09:33 pm »
Warning:

Advertising break...

Go vote for your favourite ride report of the year

Of course I am not suggesting, ahem, this one, not being competitive at all.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2014, 02:15:44 pm by Kamanya »
I wonder where that road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. Appologies to Mr Frost

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Offline westfrogger

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #185 on: December 05, 2014, 05:02:55 pm »
I'll vote for you if you can finish this report before the next load-shed dump hits.  :spitcoffee:
 

Offline tau

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #186 on: December 05, 2014, 06:40:46 pm »
Andries you have my respect for riding that big bike so welle and controlled. I am super jealous. Maybe oneday the planets line-up and I will be able to do Amageza again. Well done boet.
 

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #187 on: December 05, 2014, 07:03:50 pm »
Maybe one day the planets line-up and I will be able to do Amageza again. Well done boet.

This I want to see! What will it take for that to happen?
 

Offline Rickus

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #188 on: December 06, 2014, 09:35:38 am »
Maybe one day the planets line-up and I will be able to do Amageza again. Well done boet.

This I want to see! What will it take for that to happen?

That will open up a whole new can of worms..... ::) As jy wel die besluit neem om te ry, moet jy dit asb n groot geheim hou anders sal van die groot name dalk daarteen besluit om deel te neem  :biggrin:


OMVAL EN OPTEL.....
 

Offline tau

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #189 on: December 06, 2014, 11:18:21 am »
Maybe one day the planets line-up and I will be able to do Amageza again. Well done boet.

This I want to see! What will it take for that to happen?

At the moment work has me pinned down so badly that I struggle to make any commitments long in advance and after Dakar I promised my dad 3 years of "no more crazy ideas".

And secondly the $$$$$$$ factor. When I had a rallye bike that is all I had. Now I have a bike I can do MX on and outrides and Off-road races. Unfortunately to run a proper rally with long stages and proper riding asks a good bike, enough days of riding and distance and all of these = a big stash of cash. Rallye is mean in that way, however that is the way it is.

I take my hat of to everybody that gets a bike together and makes it to the start. That is by far the most difficult part of rallye. The riding is easy, if your bike was prepped proper.

Amageza according so some of my racing friends was brilliant and some of them are impossible to please. So HUGE thumbs-up to Alex. To the die-hard manne on adventure bikes that participate huge respect.
 

Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #190 on: December 07, 2014, 03:46:01 am »
Stage 4
SPRINGBOK TO SUTHERLAND
6 November 2014
561km - Marathon Stage
Liaison: 390km
Special: 171km



I’d hardly closed my eyes, how did the morning come so fast? Rallying does strange things to time; when your arse is trying to find a less uncomfortable spot on the saddle, it slows right down and takes forever, when your sleep is involved it speeds it up and slips by in a blink.

The scene of normal rally prep last night





Nicklaus and support





Not sure what was going on here, Warp drive module?



3 down, 2 to go



My hovel for the race



Today was going to be big in more ways than one; Firstly it was a long one. Second it was the first day of a marathon stage. Marathon stages are a bit of a worry. Basically you have 2 days and one evening without support. If anything goes wrong during the day, you’ve only got what you can carry to sort it out.

This version though had a bit of a safety valve built in. Although we were riding from Springbok to Sutherland, the support crews were allowed to spend 90 minutes with us in Calvinia. It is a small town 120k’s from Sutherland and after the Special so that would be a bit of a help if something went wrong.

Justin and I were confident that I would be fine and more importantly the bike wouldn’t need anything, so he was going to take a support break and go party with Dewalt in Vredenburg and then meet me in Cape Town. I think Justin was just miffed that Riaan had spurned his advances and was going off to sulk in a Namaqua Winery to drown his sorrows.

By now, mornings were well practiced. I had one small panic when I realised that the batteries in my GPS were no good and got them changed right at the start line. Other than that it seemed to be a shortish stage and longish liaison. Nothing to it… surely?



The motivation message had started to sink a bit…



Roberts was no better. I think Justin was thinking about his party coming up that evening…





Parents?











A better day for the lad was due



One last kiss and hug for Justin, till we meet again and I was off down the N7 for the next adventure.



One irritating thing that I regularly do is forget to put earplugs in. I consider them not only a sensible thing to have for ear protection but they are a major rider safety device in that they considerably cut down how fatiguing wind roar can be. My concentration levels go up noticeably with them in. Not sure why, less stimulation?

Anyway, with my bike having a throttle lock and the road being a tarred national one, I saw no reason to stop and put them in when I could do it whilst moving. Peter who’d been pared with me had this to say, “Once again a pleasure riding with you..... even if you did scare the shit outa me on that one liaison when u calmly had ur bike on cruise control and took off ur helmet to put in ur ear plugs.... at 100km/hour... hahaha.”





In all the many years and literally hundreds of times I’ve driven the N7, I’ve always wondered what lay behind Kamieskroon and have never had the time to find out. Fortunately Alex solved that little issue of mine that morning. It was a fabulous ride. Crisp morning air on lovely jeep track that wound its way through the hills. It was a stunning morning of riding.

We were scheduled to fill up a bit at a 4 house dorp called Kliprand I think. For some reason there was no pump operating. When I got there, some guys had some major issues with cracked sumps and fuel tanks from the jeep track. JB weld I believe recued their race.

All too soon it was over and the Special about to start.

I was pretty calm and not really in a majorly aggressively competitive mood, more a contained one. Almost as though my world had earplugs in and I was just focussing on one thing at a time.

I remember right at the start was some hugely fast white gravel roads along some farm fences cut by a ton of gates. The GPS says it was 148 at times. I was really getting into the mood. However we’d been warned of some lethal triple caution ditches in that section and I was very wary of them. My bike doesn’t do emergency flights so well.

There were about 8 of them. They were like massive speed humps. I know the smaller bikes can take this kind of stuff much quicker than me so played it really safe. Some guys had some frights and sadly one chap had to be airlifted out with broken wrists because of them.



Half way through the stage was a neutral zone to go get more fuel in Loeriefontein.


They had road works on that stretch and I found an overflowing water tank on poles and parked under it for a few seconds to get a bit soaked and cool off.

Just after this was tricky with a lot of erosion damage that made the route quick tricky. Lots of panic braking marks on the road with some of the guys having a few hairy stories to tell.

This is a section lent to me by Jan, really amazingly cool stuff. I see a gaggle of photographers there. I only remember seeing 2. Tunnel vision and all.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/avyuCxc5iMk" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/avyuCxc5iMk</a>

The last stretch was open gravel with no restrictions. It was super fast. I've got 160 on the GPS there. I was pretty in the zone and having a ball.

At the end of the stage, I was suddenly dog tired with 40k’s to Calvinia.

It was as if a switch had been thrown, I was almost falling asleep in the seat. I felt like a pair of 950’s were on my eyelids. As I didn’t have to bother with servicing and meeting with Justin, I could have re-fuelled and carried on to Sutherland another 160k’s away. There was no way I was going to be able to do that without a power nap. I pulled into the car parks designated service area, pulled off my helmet and camelback lay down and was instantly asleep.



A while later I was shaken awake, smashed a boerie roll into my face and pointed in the direction of Sutherland.

I really enjoyed the 160k’s of almost entirely gravel to Sutherland. It had a speed limit of 120kph for almost the whole way. I had a fine time trying to keep to that. On my GPS’s tracks, it shows for the 157k’s I averaged 112kph and not once went over 120. Pretty neat if you’ve ever tried to keep an average up over distance.

I was really curious about how it would work in Sutherland. I’ve been in the boys hostel on previous Amageza’s.









I was hungry and needed a good eat, so climbed into a Room with Thomas of Omega Fiberglass Products and his buddy Juan. The two of them together are a laugh a minute and both very quick. also they both have anti-gravity front wheels on their bikes and can wheelie for miles. The dorm rooms were 4 beds big, Ian was the brave soul who made up the foursome.



I Shucked my kit, had a shower. Pulled on my longjohns and a shirt, got my slops out and headed to the really great bar call the Jupiter Room. There were many who had the same idea.

It had been a pretty long day







Some repairs to the back brake. Willem of tube-lending-I-owe-stage-3-to fame, he does not appear that big because of the lens, he is that big!



“I swear Honey, it not dangerous... At all!....And, I'm not racing, just enjoying the ride and chilling. Thinking lots of you and can't wait to get home! Yes, I am eating enough and they are feeding us all 5 food groups and no beer! Love you!”







One huge steak and a few beers later, I was back in the hostel chewing the fat with Ian. The briefing in another building was delayed to 8:30 so back to the hostel where I fell asleep and never even moved till morning. In fact I didn’t even make it under the bedding. I was out. I don’t think it was because of too much fun and rallying, I am sure it was Justin’s fault for dragging me out to the steak house the first night that had finally caught up with me….

But, I came 13th in the stage!

Stage 4

13th of 59 official finishers, 2hrs 07min, 17.47% slower than the fastest finisher.

0 minutes 14 seconds in penalties... Considering how close I kept to the limit for those 160k’s….

Probably my best result in a stage ever considering the other riders. Who said the pigs can’t fly? Gotta love it when a 10 year old 990 beats up on factory rally 690 & 450 bikes and riders! How often will I ever be able to say again that I have beaten Riaan, Albert, Gideon and Peter in a rally stage?

Shouting at the wind is important, if only for oneself!
« Last Edit: December 07, 2014, 08:49:46 pm by Kamanya »
I wonder where that road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. Appologies to Mr Frost

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Offline trevorwb

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #191 on: December 07, 2014, 05:26:33 am »
Thanks Andrew a great RR this.
 

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #192 on: December 07, 2014, 09:34:54 am »
We are with you all the way. Great read and pics.
 

Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #193 on: December 19, 2014, 12:02:46 am »
Stage 5

Southerland to Cape Town
7 November 2014
372km - Team Supported Race Stage
Liaison: 286km
Special: 86km



Special Stage



That was a SLEEP!

I suppose that I had been having too much of a good time. I had been going to bed later than was necessary and besides the epic riding, really enjoying the chatting and socialising aspect of the race. It’s so easy to get involved in a chat with the service crews and hear their stories and backgrounds.

But, that’s a core part of the reason I really like this race. I think I am good enough to be reasonably competitive. I think with the right bike and a few less kilo’s and a couple more laps around Table Mountain on my mountain bike a top 10 is not out of reach. A stage podium with a large dose of luck and faultless navigation could also could be possible. However great those would be, there are so many aspects to multi-stage racing that are just plain good fun and an enormous privilege, that conking out for the night without doing my roadbook was a small price to pay.

One thing that I had gotten right before I headed off to bed was to take some photo’s of the roadbook and post them onto the forum.

A frustration for me as an internet spectator is not knowing exactly where the route goes and more importantly, where the specials start. This is a necessary evil as without the secrecy, two things may happen; there will be some who may be tempted to get outside help. Or, some internet supporter trying to be helpful because they can see real time the mistakes phones or SMS’s the rider.

As I was sure, no one from our little band of racers would be vaguely interested in cheating, or that the people on the forum would do such a thing, I posted the route up with no worries to my conscience.

This is what a un-worked on road book looks like.





Normally there’s a bunch of colouring in that happens the night before. The reason for “marking your roadbook” is;

•   Get at least a bit familiar with the day.
•   Because there is a lot of info in such a small space, giving colours to the different bits of data is not only helpful when belting along, but can be life saving. Sort of an early warning system.

The left hand box has in big numbers the accumulative distance from the time you leave the bivouac. The small numbers on the right are the leg length and seldom if ever used.
The middle box gives an idea of what is going to happen in a simplified hieroglyph with some code or added info
The right hand box is an info box with instructions, rules of the road, GPS positions of waypoints, etc.

Because the French invented rallying the unit standard on rallies is always in French. It’s quite cool as it adds another degree of complexity to an already pretty convoluted story.

Here's all the code translated;



So for example at 24.79km this is a triple caution. Triple cautions are to be marked in red and are super dangerous. They can be lethal if not approached with a lot of caution. The instructions say there is a ditch and to ride around it, not go through it. On the video the guy lying in the dirt was caught out by this one. You also get to hear just how easy it is to screw this kind of warning up.

Mostly the things that ruin a good day are the FZ’s and DZ’s These are French for start of speed zone and end of speed zone. E.g. at 29.72km. this speed zone lasts until 30.63km. Any speed over 100kph in this zone is going to collect a few minutes.

At 29.72 there is also a GPS waypoint shown in the bottom right corner of the right hand box. These are God sends. When very lost, these can be of enormous relief. They are a safety feature for those that get hopelessly lost. Still, it doesn’t help to enter these in wrong the night before… as I have done. A single digit wrong can mean looking for a waypoint in the arctic ocean instead of the track next to klipberg in the Richtersveld.

Anyway, if you haven’t figured it out by now, navigation is not just critically essential to be competitive, it is for all including the slowest and fastest literally a life saver.


So much for that navigation lesson… Juan and Thomas were hugely complimentary about my snoring ability,



Ian was nerding with his roadbook.



I wasn’t even going to bother, I would try riding it blind. I was reassured by Robert who had had a tough day 3 and thus didn’t mark his day 4 and had said that it wasn’t an issue.



I had filled the tanks to the brim in Calvinia and on working out distances realised that with this stage to be the most technical and short, I was hopelessly too full on fuel, I needed to lose at least 10 litres to be safe. I had been on 2 previous Amagezas in this area and knew that being too heavy would be unpleasant.

Getting rid of 10 litres of fuel at 5am is not easy. I knew there was a poorer community a few blocks from the start and found some kind soul who was happy to be given 10 litres of fuel into an old bucket.







Johnathan not in a queue… but surely asking Alex where one is





At the start of the liaison Alex shepherded us into our starting order and unlike in the past, we then all rode in formation to the start of the stage about 18ks away. I had a mild panic attack as I had misplaced my glove in the faffing at the start so had resolved to ride the stage with one glove. Fortunately on the 18ks to the start, it was where I put it – in my pocket. Chop!

I hate to say it but I was missing Justin’s organised presence.



We stopped at some non-descript little track and lined up ready to go;







This time I was sent off on my own. By being 13th the day before, I was up near the sharp end. My bike is not built for technical trails and I was sure to hold up a bunch of quicker guys behind me.

A final empty of the bladder and Stage 5 was a GO!

There is something about a last stage. I felt almost like I didn’t want to do it. Not because there was some dread about it, but precisely because this was the last time. A bit like regretfully drinking the last bit of a fine bottle of wine that accompanied an amazing meal with brilliant friends and wishing to be able to start at the beginning again. All the pleasure of those moments have gone by and this last sip will, too, signify a closure of sorts that opening another bottle will not bring back.

But all good things come to an end if only, because by their endings, they allow the next good thing to start.

It was technical and tight, just tons of 2nd and 3rd gear jeep tracks through farmers lands over Karoo type hills and valleys that only on the Amageza one is privileged enough to see.

We had all been warned about some hectic triple cautions that I was really trying to keep an eye on. Because of the tightness my head was in the roadbook quite a lot. At the indicated triple, Walter on 166 had come off pretty hard only seconds in front of me. You can see him in the video still on the floor but thankfully not hurt much.

On watching the video, I was reminded that as opposed to an adventure ride where when a someone comes off like this, it is normally a good time to stop and have a good chat and take pictures. This was a race and a quick, “are you ok”, is really all that one does. Then it’s back on it, thanking my stars that it was not me.

At one stage I saw Riaan and gaggle of riders coming back towards me. I should have not second guessed myself. I was sure I was right, but here were all the front runners coming back?!!

I turned back and soon realised that I must have been right all along so left the gaggle and made my way back to the previous roadbook mark that I knew to be correct a few k’s back from where I’d turned around, synced my trips to the roadbook there as Riaan arrived to do the same and carried on.

It was interesting to see that he too, quickly abandoned casting about looking for the right route and made his way back to the last known place. Riding around in circles looking for the right turning only confuses the decision making because the trip meters quickly become useless – they keep picking up distance whilst on the roadbook one is not. It’s best to stop guessing and go back to the last know point and work it out from there.

Shortly after that though, I had the biggest scare of the whole race. What should have been a triple caution was unmarked on a straightish piece of track, (the blur is some water from a just crossed river), see nothing and the route book said so too.



What made it even worse was the deep rut about 15 meters before it that threw me into the air only to land with no time to sort out the mess up ahead.

Then the real danger was a deep erosion ditch across the track with sharpish rocks in the opposite bank and an erosion gully leading into it right on the line.

I was doing about 70 when I saw the gully, managed to tap off, shed a little bit of speed, whack the big rut and get a bit airborn to land and see the ditch.

I’ve watched the video of it and my recollection of the event is far slower than the video. Time really does slow down when about to see your arse!

I can remember thinking,

“Shit! Ok, hang on through this rut!”



“Oh no!, Look at that! Did I miss it in the roadbook?” (look at all the panic marks)



“ok, you’ll never brake in time! Even if you try to keep braking, the nose will go in and you’ll whack those rocks!”

“That’s not an option!”

“Just whack open the throttle, weight back and hope!”



“Muther #)@(*$@&!!”

In the video, this all takes just 3 seconds.

That would have broken something on me or the bike if I had gone into it for sure. I dodged a big bullet there.

The track wound its way on for a few more k’s and then to the escarpment. I’d heard lots of bad tales about this section of the track but it was really very pleasant with not much to deal with other than the loose shale stuff around the switch backs. The sharpest and steepest had a gaggle of photographers. I can’t help but think of a vulture when this happens… But they do get the shots!














With less than 15k’s to the finish I came down of a jump and half the right hand footpeg broke off?

It’s not fun riding like that. I didn’t realise just how much one needs them.

For the last bit, it was possible to ride it quite quickly. It was relatively straight old jeep track with some river crossings with water in them. But I had a mix of joy and paranoia going on. The joy was all about just living the moment of being close to the finish of something that was a really big goal coming to fruition. And the paranoia was the fear of it being taken away by some silly root or rock or inattention. I was gunning it where it was absolutely safe to do so, but backing off far in advance of anything remotely looking like trouble. I imagine it’s something that all people feel when they’ve put so much into something.

What a day! A stunning route with amazing weather and the bike purring away under me.

Andy the marshal was at the finish to congratulate us.



I’d done it, the racing stage was over. But there was a hell of a long way to the end of the day’s stage. 317k’s to be exact!



« Last Edit: December 19, 2014, 12:25:30 am by Kamanya »
I wonder where that road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. Appologies to Mr Frost

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Offline JustBendIt

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #194 on: December 19, 2014, 03:18:05 am »
In best Borat accent " IS NICE "
The older I get the faster I was
 

Offline DirtyHarry

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #195 on: December 19, 2014, 06:26:58 am »
What a privilege to be able to ride on these great farm roads.
What a ride...
No wonder you all want to do the next Amageza.
Very well done Andrew  :thumleft:
 

Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #196 on: December 19, 2014, 07:47:35 am »
Last liaison home...


The video of the stage

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/FkypOeksInM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/FkypOeksInM</a>


Once i'd rolled through the stage finish, I stopped for a bit to check everything and have a chat with some guys.

The previous year on the last liaison I had buggered up the navigation and spent and extra 150k’s trying to untangle myself from that mess, I wasn’t going to repeat this.

So, with a last firing up the big girl it was Cape Town here we come! The first bit of the liaison was a stunning track with tons of brilliant corners for sliding into and out of. There were many, like me, who wrote how they felt about this with huge snaking lines into and out of the corners and a few taking a visit to the bush now and again, me included. Somehow the paranoia had disappeared and it was just joy!

The last 80k’s or so were painful. There was a lot of the road that was 60 or 70kph. I was determined not to pick up any speeding penalties just to get to the beer earlier. There was even one section of 5k’s at 40kph! It’s quite amazing just how much of our roads nobody drives to the limit!

Claude, a chap down from Kawazulu Natal, I rode together for the last 50 or so. It wasn’t so bad to have someone to share a sore bum with. Actually, I seldom potter along  on this bike, it really doesn’t like to do that. So being forced to go real slow was actually quite enjoyable to check out the views and smells.

With Table Mountain in view, I gave my camera to Claude whilst we pottered along at a sedate 60 to take a few and got some of him too.





Riding into Big Bay with table mountain in the background and a bunch of familiar faces was hugely enjoyable. The beer tasted excellent.



Justin and Kobus



Just about time to start bench racing



Hold thumbs for this man, Albert is in the Dakar in a few week’s time



I presume the family turning out to greet Pieter and the smallest bike in the race



The fastest bullets in the world either side of me. If Kobie, on the left, can learn to navigate and get a bit fitter, he’s an easy top ten. Gideon could win it next year!



Rudi and Co





Buddy Rob



They got to the finish line, that thing is not slow!



Peter



Mild landrovering



Discussing favourite knitting patterns







Father Kevin…



Son Dale



I don’t think that HP2 is doing another one. Hat’s off!








Tough times require soft measures



War wounds



There’s a broken bone in there somewhere





Alex squeezing out a tear or two at prize giving was memorable.







And just like that, my Amageza 2014 was over.





I was hugely satisfied with my Rally. I had had a ton of fun and laughs, did not get hurt or damage the bike. Also, there was something about sharing a large part of the journey with Justin and I am a bit miffed he’s going to be riding it next year as he really is an outstanding support guy. He deserves a large share of my finishers medal.



Again, to the Big LC8 KTM, what a machine!

I was asked during the race on the forum if given the choice would I take the bike again, my answer then – “No!”

But now that I’ve reflected a bit, this is my answer;

If I cannot afford another bike, I am confident that it would do another one and probably 4 or 5 more. It’s a beast! It goes where you point it, is tough and reliable, crashes very well and needs little to no maintenance. However, if anyone is thinking of doing it on one of these, you’ll need to be a few things;

Not worried at all of throwing it down the track. Repeatedly.
Can dead lift the bike up 10 times in a row.
Be very competent riding in very technical and very sandy and rocky stuff for hours at a time.
Have an over active sense of humour for those occasions when it’s not that funny anymore.


Stage 5

30th of 58 official finishers, 2hrs 08min, 22.92% slower than the fastest finisher.

1 minute 0 seconds in penalties



So overall I was

22nd of 58 official finishers, 21hrs 48min, 35.91% slower than the fastest finisher.

11 minutes 0 seconds in penalties...Which was 4th best overall in navigation and penalty avoidance – massive up from last year where I had more than 2 hours’ worth.



There are only 55 of these in the world, you going to come and get one next year?



Roll on 2015!



« Last Edit: December 19, 2014, 08:00:17 pm by Kamanya »
I wonder where that road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. Appologies to Mr Frost

You want to have a stable Picture & Video host?

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Offline Mr Zog

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #197 on: December 19, 2014, 08:42:34 am »
I can't see the video Andrew, says it is "private"  :(
Young enough to know I can, old enough to know I shouldn't, stupid enough to do it anyway.
 

Offline Kamanya

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Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #198 on: December 19, 2014, 08:56:24 am »
I can't see the video Andrew, says it is "private"  :(

Ah, you should be able to now?
I wonder where that road goes? And that, has usually made all the difference. Appologies to Mr Frost

You want to have a stable Picture & Video host?

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Offline Buff

Re: Amageza 2014 with a Jagsding
« Reply #199 on: December 19, 2014, 09:02:07 am »
What a superb RR Andrew, thank you  :thumleft:

Well done once again, on the report and that well deserved, limited edition, Finishers medal  :thumleft:
Present bikes: BETA 300RR, KTM 690, Yamaha WR250F

If you're dumb you gotta be tough !!!