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Online Road Hog

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #40 on: January 29, 2015, 02:08:15 pm »
Rule No.1 - For Me It Is Stay Awake
« Last Edit: February 02, 2015, 09:51:57 pm by Road Hog »
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Offline ButtSlider

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #41 on: January 29, 2015, 03:50:55 pm »
If you can't see the cage drivers face in his mirror he can't see you. If you can't see his face move!
I firmly believe in this one.
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Offline DaddyK

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #42 on: January 29, 2015, 04:06:49 pm »
And my 2c worth:

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Offline Boytjie

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #43 on: January 29, 2015, 04:13:30 pm »
and when lane splitting in heavy traffic, look out for other bikes coming from the side. Amazing how many bikers just "assume" the split lane to be open and not check for other bikes coming along between the cars. Have had a number of close calls due to this.
 

Offline Baas Attie

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #44 on: January 29, 2015, 08:22:16 pm »
Straatkat  -  How about you summarise all the GOOD ones in a new thread ?
RM125;  RM250;  KX125;  KX250;  KDX200;  CBX1000;  CR250;  YZ426F; Hausaberg 650sm;  Vespa 200;  CR250F;  YZ250F;  KTM250 SX-F;  WR250F;  BMW F800;  BMW X-CHALLANGE; BMW F800GS;  Vuka 110;  950SE; KTM 690 R; KTM  690 DUKE; BETA 300; KTM 990R; KTM 1190R; HUSQVARNA 350; KTM Super Duke; Husqvarna 701; KTM 350; Yamaha R6;Honda CBR150; Husky 401
 

Offline Straatkat

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #45 on: January 29, 2015, 10:06:09 pm »
BA, that's a good idea, wow over 1000 views and counting! :thumleft:
Some very good ideas came out of this, I think if it keeps us safer on the roads out there it's a win win.
Will see if I have time over the week-end to summarise all the good ones...umm they are all good.
18 till I die.
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Offline Tito

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #46 on: January 29, 2015, 10:29:38 pm »
I will ride one finger brake and two finger cluch when things are  getting Complicated .
That means I can gear up gear down brake and use the finger as a throttle steady all without spending any time moving my hands.Seconds are vital when stealing metres in an emergency braking situation.
Bliping a four stroke on the down change is a muscle memory to be encouraged as it means that even if your reasonably high up in the rev range in a gear and you are presented with a dangerous situation you can almost imediately gear down.
Teach yourself to first apply the back brake hard  when you get a fright .....giving yourself a split second to decide if your going to use the front as well ...that stops the dangerous snatching of the front brake one of the leading causes of bike accidents.
Target fixation when braking hard is human nature ....example a car has pulled out in front of you, the biker is braking hard and stairing at the car door front wheel or bonnet ...When you practice braking hard also practice letting your brakes off and swerving right or left....Starting first with a head turn ...Look where you want to go ..
Ride it like you stole it  !!!!!! If your Afraid of Death Your Afraid of Life, Only the Rocks Live Forever !!!!!!
 

Offline Bundu

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #47 on: January 29, 2015, 11:32:14 pm »
I will ride one finger brake and two finger cluch when things are  getting Complicated .
That means I can gear up gear down brake and use the finger as a throttle steady all without spending any time moving my hands.Seconds are vital when stealing metres in an emergency braking situation.
Bliping a four stroke on the down change is a muscle memory to be encouraged as it means that even if your reasonably high up in the rev range in a gear and you are presented with a dangerous situation you can almost imediately gear down.
Teach yourself to first apply the back brake hard  when you get a fright .....giving yourself a split second to decide if your going to use the front as well ...that stops the dangerous snatching of the front brake one of the leading causes of bike accidents.
Target fixation when braking hard is human nature ....example a car has pulled out in front of you, the biker is braking hard and stairing at the car door front wheel or bonnet ...When you practice braking hard also practice letting your brakes off and swerving right or left....Starting first with a head turn ...Look where you want to go ..

some nice comments  :thumleft: but as you call it "things getting complicated", I normally gear down one and do most of the rest of the stuff you mentioned, except that with my linked brakes, I hit front (with linked back) when things get tooooo complicated  ;)
 

Offline manta

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2015, 10:15:53 am »
If you see a vehicle pulling over to the verge or on the verge, ALWAYS assume they are going to a U-turn.
 

Offline MickeyT

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #49 on: January 30, 2015, 10:48:09 am »
I picked up a couple of handy hints - thanks guys.

When lane-splitting in heavy traffic - don't weave in and out of the lanes like Rossi prior the start of the race - firstly, if a cager slams his brakes, you're fooked;  Secondly, not only the cagers, but bikes behind you don't know and can't predict your next move - stay in the center and keep your line;

If you're one of the superbike ouks that like to speed past a fellow biker in traffic, if you can't or won't slow down, at least  make sure that when you pass him, you don't try and get as close as possible in the passing.

When going through intersections or lane-splitting in faster-moving traffic, try and pass between two vehicles - that way, the cages protect you from other vehicles.

When lane-splitting in heavy traffic, mark cages that change lanes, as they are the ones looking for gaps in the other lane most of the time, and will act as soon as there is some sort of an opening in the next lane.
"I drifted into photography like one drifts into prostitution. First I did it to please myself, then I did it to please my friends, and eventually I did it for the money." Philippe Halsman
 

Offline jagter

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #50 on: January 30, 2015, 11:16:55 am »
- Pre-load the front brake (just a tiny little bit) when approaching a dodgy looking intersection. That way you can apply max braking force immediately if needed.  This is my favorite trick, and saved my ass many times.

- Ride in a lower gear in traffic.  Keep the bike in the power rev range.

- When about to overtake, look ahead of the car you plan on taking.  If it's too 'busy' in front of him, don't do it.   For example if there is a car waiting to turn in from a side street, a taxi pulled over a couple of hundred meters further, and say someone in the road about to turn right.  Just stay behind your man. Too many drivers in one place, with at least 1 bound to do something unexpected.

- When turning right across robot intersections, try to keep a car between you and oncoming traffic.  It does screw with your view a bit, but that car provides a nice heavy barrier between you and red light skippers.

- When lane splitting you are better off between 2 cars (even if it feels claustrophobic) than in a gap.  Cars go for the gaps without warning, but a car will rarely try to ram another car.

- Ride like you are invisible, and as if everyone else is a moron (Because you are invisible and people go into some catatonic moron state when driving)

- Don't be a chop. Adjust speed to match conditions.  140km/h down a busy city street with cars pulling out of parkings left right and center, with lots of intersections and pedestrians is suicide.





 

Offline Garfield

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #51 on: January 30, 2015, 11:18:55 am »
Having right-of-way means very little on a bike, and even less in a hospital bed - the bigger vehicle wins every time.
 

Offline jagter

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #52 on: January 30, 2015, 11:25:50 am »
I wrote off a bike by accelerating too hard off the white line after the light went green. The taxi from the opposite side decided to take the gap and turn in front of oncoming traffic before they got up to speed. I T'd him in the middle of the intersection. I was busy consulting the handlebar mounted GPS when the light went green, I was lane splitting and I did not want to stand while cars started moving. Lesson: make sure the junction is safe before starting to accelerate.

I saw a lady on a GS who T'd a car on the interjunction of Blaauwberg Road crossing Parklands Main/Pentz. Cars from the sea turning right think they can slip past in front of the oncoming traffic before the light goes green for west bound traffic. In practice the west bound cars have already started moving when some cager thinks that can just take that last right turn chance.

The chancers become more by the day - we are chancers when we don't check ourselves.

I've seen that happen right in front of me. At Century City, from century boulevard turning onto the N1.  Wasn't maybe you? 600ish superbike? about 7 years ago.
 

Offline meteldog

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #53 on: January 30, 2015, 12:56:31 pm »
On gravel, when you see a car coming towards you, hug the road as far to the left as you possibly can. It's likely that there is a car(s) behind the oncoming car sitting in its dust, they often move over to their right to see if their is something oncoming (or sometimes just overtake) and will take you out coming form the other side.

I have had this happen to me on the R355 and in Namibia.
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Offline meteldog

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #54 on: January 30, 2015, 01:01:44 pm »
On gravel, when you see a car coming towards you, hug the road as far to the left as you possibly can. It's likely that there is a car(s) behind the oncoming car sitting in its dust, they often move over to their right to see if their is something oncoming (or sometimes just overtake) and will take you out coming from the other side.

I have had this happen to me on the R355 and in Namibia.
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Offline Geriatrix

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #55 on: January 30, 2015, 02:00:39 pm »
On gravel, when you see a car coming towards you, hug the road as far to the left as you possibly can. It's likely that there is a car(s) behind the oncoming car sitting in its dust, they often move over to their right to see if their is something oncoming (or sometimes just overtake) and will take you out coming from the other side.

I have had this happen to me on the R355 and in Namibia.

If a truck is approaching and kicking up a lot of dust, consider getting completely off the road and stop. There could be another vehicle about to pass him, taking up the full width of your side of the road.
Clinicians can contact the clinicians' hotline number on 0800 111 131 (for doctors only); and, in addition to 0800 029 999, the public can also contact the public hotline number on 0800 111 132. These lines all operate 24 hours a day.
 

Online silberfuchs

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #56 on: January 31, 2015, 04:16:04 pm »
Thanks for all the good hints, some of them really new to me.

I have only one principle:

    DO NOT ASSUME THAT ANY OTHER DRIVER BEHAVES ACCORDING TO THE RULES OF COMMON SENSE AND GOOD REASON
                                           OR THE LAW - FOR THAT MATTER

After 23 years of living in (mostly South) Africa, being familiar with SA since the very early 1980ies and having done maybe 700.000 km (mostly in Land Cruiser type vehicles) between Arusha and Cape Town as well as Swakopmund and Beira:
   
     Driving habits here are still a thriller to me!

Many daily observable road habits hereabout would put these guys off the road and right into police custody in Europe (and I guess in the US of A too, from the little bit I saw there).

While the urban cage drivers and some rural bakkie pilots can be credited with an (unfounded) belief into the protective qualities of their mounts, quite a stunning number of our biker colleagues seem to have already reached the immortality that we all hope for. (see e.g.: Gauteng commuting battle field).

Therefore I stay off the busy tarroads and motorways, travel the wonderful gravel roads of this beautiful country and fall off my bike by my own doing and without enemy contact. :ricky:







 

Offline Tito

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Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #57 on: January 31, 2015, 05:44:57 pm »
I will ride one finger brake and two finger cluch when things are  getting Complicated .
That means I can gear up gear down brake and use the finger as a throttle steady all without spending any time moving my hands.Seconds are vital when stealing metres in an emergency braking situation.
Bliping a four stroke on the down change is a muscle memory to be encouraged as it means that even if your reasonably high up in the rev range in a gear and you are presented with a dangerous situation you can almost imediately gear down.
Teach yourself to first apply the back brake hard  when you get a fright .....giving yourself a split second to decide if your going to use the front as well ...that stops the dangerous snatching of the front brake one of the leading causes of bike accidents.
Target fixation when braking hard is human nature ....example a car has pulled out in front of you, the biker is braking hard and stairing at the car door front wheel or bonnet ...When you practice braking hard also practice letting your brakes off and swerving right or left....Starting first with a head turn ...Look where you want to go ..

some nice comments  :thumleft: but as you call it "things getting complicated", I normally gear down one and do most of the rest of the stuff you mentioned, except that with my linked brakes, I hit front (with linked back) when things get tooooo complicated  ;)



Thanks  :thumleft:....Yeah linked brakes, abs and traction control the way of the future ....Definately harder to make Mistakes on than the Old School Stuff..
Ride it like you stole it  !!!!!! If your Afraid of Death Your Afraid of Life, Only the Rocks Live Forever !!!!!!
 

Offline Geriatrix

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #58 on: January 31, 2015, 06:21:51 pm »
No matter how good the clothes are, the skeleton needs decent muscle strength to support the bones and joints.
Go to gym and get strong.
Clinicians can contact the clinicians' hotline number on 0800 111 131 (for doctors only); and, in addition to 0800 029 999, the public can also contact the public hotline number on 0800 111 132. These lines all operate 24 hours a day.
 

Offline MickeyT

Re: How to stay alive on a bike
« Reply #59 on: February 01, 2015, 04:32:01 pm »
No matter how good the clothes are, the skeleton needs decent muscle strength to support the bones and joints.
Go to gym and get strong.

Now THAT is wise words!  :thumleft:
"I drifted into photography like one drifts into prostitution. First I did it to please myself, then I did it to please my friends, and eventually I did it for the money." Philippe Halsman