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Offline Draadwerk

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Breaking in new bikes
« on: May 29, 2016, 09:46:00 pm »
Read about this on another forum.  What say the tech guys about this?

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 

Offline 2wdrift

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2016, 09:57:02 pm »
I tried it once, seemed to work and motor hasnt given any issues yet and its 20k km later.
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Offline Scribble

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2016, 11:56:03 pm »
The logic seems sound
also curious to hear what those in the know  have to say
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Offline Single Cylinder

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2016, 02:51:10 am »
Sounds very interesting   :sip:
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Offline luv2ride

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2016, 05:11:17 am »
I have heard this before and know someone who claims to have done it. He had a 600 Fazer that did some serious trouble free mileage.

Ek is te armgat om nuut te koop :imaposer:Iemand anders loop my bikes in :ricky:

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Offline TheBear

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2016, 06:28:56 am »
It may make some sense for a racing vehicle.  I am not at all sure it is such a great idea for a vehicle that I paid big bucks for and that must last me 5 or more years.

Some concerns:

-  It is on the internet, therefore must be true ......
-  Who do you hold responsible if it does not work?  
-  I happen to know a few racers and they run new engines in.  
-  Why would we pay a manufacturer R200k for a bike, trust their manufacturing, trust their product, trust their service and maintenance schedule and then rather trust some internet dude than the manufacturers run-in schedule?

« Last Edit: May 30, 2016, 06:34:59 am by TheBear »
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Offline silvrav

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2016, 07:18:49 am »
 :sip:
 

Offline Regis Laconi

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2016, 07:48:50 am »
We have tested this before.  But only on two of the same bikes.  A few years ago a friend and I bought Honda CRF 450's.  We only ever go riding together, so the ours on

he bikes were almost identical.  I took the soft approach where my friend just nailed it from the word go.  After 75 ours we opened the motors to check valves and replace

pistons.  The wear on the bike were identical.  There was no way you could see any extra wear on my friends motor.  I still take it easy in the beginning and ride according to

the owner's manual.  We did dyno the bikes at 100 ours.  His bike made a bit more power where mine made a bit more torque.  We also have the same slip-on, air filter the

works.  I've never had a engine fail on me and neither has he.
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Offline Matewis

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2016, 08:06:37 am »
Ek kan net praat uit 'n kar oogpunt. Het my Corolla gekry met 53km op die klok. Het hom vir 1000km mooi gery, onder 4000rpm ratte gewissel ens. Die volgende 1000km het ek die lewendige hel uit hom gery. gewissel as hy limit. Moet bysę ek ry nooit 'n kar hard voor hy nie op normale temperatuur is nie. Vir 'n 1.4 het hy gelykpad 200km/h geloop(196km/h GPS spoed) en die ou wat hom na my gevat het het die kar geprang op 332000km.

Ons race-kar dieselfde storie. Kar gebou en engine gemod. Rooilyn het op 8000rpm gelę, dit vir 'n 1600 8v. Sodra hy op normale temperatuur was kon jy met hom maak wat jy wil. Engine loop vandag nog.
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Offline lecap

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2016, 11:02:02 am »
BS. If you follow the dudes argument then there would not be any reason to rev the engine over max. torque as this is where you have max. combustion pressure and according to his theory the fastest and best bed in of the rings.




My recommendation and method practiced by me:

After assembly fill oil (and coolant where applicable, check everything's fine and tight and fire it up.
let it idle for 20 sec or so, switch off, top up oil if necessary.
Start again and idle through one full heat cycle (radiator fan on and off). Monitor for any leaks or other irregularities.


Take the bike for a nice ride:

Warm up the engine gently. Get on, switch on and ride at moderate revs for the first ten minutes / ten kilometres. (You should always do this). You should not warm up your engine at idle as a standard procedure since riding it gently achieves the same warm up quicker and without wasting fuel.

Avoid labouring the engine at low engine speed and wide throttle openings.

Avoid constant throttle over longer periods of time (if possible). Find a road with plenty of tight corners and short straights, a mountain pass is close to ideal.
Even inner city traffic works just try to stick to the main roads to avoid too much stop and go and obviously don't try it in peak traffic.

Don't go balls to the wall unless needed for a few seconds (safe overtaking).


After a minimum of three rides during each the engine must have reached full operating temperature (the mileage is not really relevant, the heat cycling is!):
Do the first scheduled engine service as specified. Obviously change oil and filter. Start using the quality oil you want to use in your engine. There is ABSOLUTELY NO reason not to start using a fully synthetic oil right here and now. Check valve clearances if scheduled.
Torque engine mounts and more importantly header pipe flange screws / nuts.
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Offline OomD

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2016, 12:16:23 pm »
Interesting article.

I remember years ago when I rebuilt my beetle's engine, using the Haynes manual as a reference, their standard rings-seating procedure was to get up to 4th gear and floor it a few times (i.e. wide open throttle). I suppose getting to 4th gear first means that there is no sudden increase in RPM's (and, obviously, no overrevving) but a marked increase in combustion chamber pressure.
 

Offline Matewis

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2016, 01:22:52 pm »
BS. If you follow the dudes argument then there would not be any reason to rev the engine over max. torque as this is where you have max. combustion pressure and according to his theory the fastest and best bed in of the rings.




My recommendation and method practiced by me:

After assembly fill oil (and coolant where applicable, check everything's fine and tight and fire it up.
let it idle for 20 sec or so, switch off, top up oil if necessary.
Start again and idle through one full heat cycle (radiator fan on and off). Monitor for any leaks or other irregularities.


Take the bike for a nice ride:

Warm up the engine gently. Get on, switch on and ride at moderate revs for the first ten minutes / ten kilometres. (You should always do this). You should not warm up your engine at idle as a standard procedure since riding it gently achieves the same warm up quicker and without wasting fuel.

Avoid labouring the engine at low engine speed and wide throttle openings.


Avoid constant throttle over longer periods of time (if possible). Find a road with plenty of tight corners and short straights, a mountain pass is close to ideal.
Even inner city traffic works just try to stick to the main roads to avoid too much stop and go and obviously don't try it in peak traffic.

Don't go balls to the wall unless needed for a few seconds (safe overtaking).


After a minimum of three rides during each the engine must have reached full operating temperature (the mileage is not really relevant, the heat cycling is!):
Do the first scheduled engine service as specified. Obviously change oil and filter. Start using the quality oil you want to use in your engine. There is ABSOLUTELY NO reason not to start using a fully synthetic oil right here and now. Check valve clearances if scheduled.
Torque engine mounts and more importantly header pipe flange screws / nuts.

This should be done every time. Daar is niks wat my meer die bliksem in maak as iemand wat my kar of fiets start en wegvlieg soos 'n hooligan nie. Dis sommer die vinnigste wat 'n vriendskap sy gat sien en jy verder loop.
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Offline 2wdrift

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Re:
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2016, 06:35:47 pm »
Just to clarify, my experience was with a rebuilt motor and not a new one. With new pistons only I tried this and it seems to be fine. With a new motor I would take it easy for longer as there are other parts that are being run in as well.

That said new motors in the factory are built and put on the dyno right away. So I am not sure how much of the  running in concept is still applicable with new motors and materials?
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Offline Sabre

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2016, 09:22:35 pm »
I ran in a few vehicles (petrol & diesel) and 3 bikes (1x 2-stroke and 2x 4-stroke). Granted, these started in 1974  ;D
 I ran them in according to manufacturer's specs, but would occasionaly open the throttle wide to expand the rings and build max pressure. Apart from the KLR all the vehicles gave me excellent mileages, and the engines performed like new past 300 000km

A KLR (2008 model) you can run in as you like, it will consume large quantities of oil early in it's life (OK Rob C, I know you are the exception  :thumleft: )

A Tribologist (oil specialist) once told me that modern engines can be run-in in something like 20km. He also said that you no longer need to use a different running-in oil from the oil that you will use for the remainder of the vehicle's life (This discussion was around mineral oils, so I am not sure if Synthetic oil is included)

Technology has certainly evolved from the days when you would see cars crawling along with a sign in the rear window that said "Please pass, running in"  :biggrin:
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Offline Mapog

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2016, 10:35:02 pm »
Remeber a manual that I worked out of for rebuilding Ford Cleveland V8s.

They very clearly stated that after fist start up, the RPMs should be over 1500 for first couple of minutes.

That was to ensure there was enough oil pressure for valvetrain, cams etc.
 

Offline Eendstop

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2016, 05:06:27 am »
Do we rather believe this twit,  or the highly qualified engineers who designed and built the engines?

My research shows the moon is made of cheese and the earth is flat,  therefore stuff NASA,  et al,  it is true  :sip:
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Offline 1190

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2016, 06:53:55 am »
I prefer the term "running in".................... "breaking in" sounds a bit to close to home  :imaposer: :imaposer:
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Offline KaTooMatt

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2016, 01:06:51 pm »
The reality is that your engine has already had a full rev run at the end of the assembly line. This is to check that nothing fles off and that the engine will hold together.

To run it now it now is futile. Also like all moving things engine groove themselves. Ride the engine they way you intend to ride it from day one. There will be less overall wear.

For the same reason don't buy a grannie's car drive the hell out of it and expect it to last. If you buy a Grannie's car if you want it to last keep driving like a Grannie. >:D
"These are not machines for the meek. Ride it like you stole it, cane it within an inch of its life. It will require a bunch of maintenance and generally tend to be, shall we say, harsh? It was bred for racing, after all. It will devour rear tires and its lust for fuel will astound you. It will suffer indifference and carelessness very poorly. Like heroin and Asian girls, it's not for everybody, but when you absolutely, positively, GOTS to beat every m*****f****** in the race, accept no substitu
 

Offline silvrav

Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2016, 01:11:18 pm »
The reality is that your engine has already had a full rev run at the end of the assembly line. This is to check that nothing fles off and that the engine will hold together.

To run it now it now is futile. Also like all moving things engine groove themselves. Ride the engine they way you intend to ride it from day one. There will be less overall wear.

For the same reason don't buy a grannie's car drive the hell out of it and expect it to last. If you buy a Grannie's car if you want it to last keep driving like a Grannie. >:D

Difference between a full rev run and a 1000km run in....question though is then for how long do they run it at the factory to check.
 

Offline TheBear

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Re: Breaking in new bikes
« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2016, 01:12:10 pm »
The reality is that your engine has already had a full rev run at the end of the assembly line. This is to check that nothing fles off and that the engine will hold together.

To run it now it now is futile. Also like all moving things engine groove themselves. Ride the engine they way you intend to ride it from day one. There will be less overall wear.

For the same reason don't buy a grannie's car drive the hell out of it and expect it to last. If you buy a Grannie's car if you want it to last keep driving like a Grannie. >:D

Thing is, the engine was revved to the limits on a dyno in the factory.  What about all the other components?

Even if a "futile" exersize, what damage can running in for 1 600km do?   
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