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Author Topic: LuckyStriker's R1200GS Adventure Report and Pimp Guide  (Read 9071 times)

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Offline LuckyStriker

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LuckyStriker?s R1200GS Adventure Report and Pimp Guide
« Reply #40 on: August 17, 2006, 08:53:37 am »
corkscrew

I did indeed experience exactly the opposite of what you say...weird...

Perhaps my tank contained more fuel
Perhaps the steering damper works even when turned all the way off
Parhaps you rode into a headwind
Perhaps the rear suspension was set to soft and the front shock to hard
It could be many factors at play here

I will say again that to me the GSA felt more stable than the 12GS
One should also keep in mind that I have not ridden the bike past the 130km/h mark yet
 

shark_za

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« Reply #41 on: August 17, 2006, 08:56:15 am »
It might be the increased radius of the new front changing the geometry.
Jack up the back a litte to see if it goes away.

Happens a lot on the KLR.
 

Offline KiLRoy

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« Reply #42 on: August 17, 2006, 10:01:04 am »
Normal courses for tank slapping (at least on the KLR) are:

Too soft rear suspension
Very loose steering nut
The effect of the big front mud guard and the 'makoloe flappe' for hand guard - especially with a 45 degree headwind
Tyre pressure
Other

Normal fixes - combination of reducing the wind drag on the handle bar (Acerbis guards), correct tyre pressure and suspension set-up and a fork brace.  The latter proofed very effective in reducing the 130km/h shake and dance and inspires confidence

My guess is that the steering damper helped reducing this effect.

H
 

Offline corkscrew

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« Reply #43 on: August 17, 2006, 09:18:36 pm »
Well I might just reconsider the Adventure then, see if I can find one to test ride with road tyres.
I'm about to order a 1200GS mainly based on the fact that I found it more stable. A bit unsure now. Thing is, if you start adding all the nice bits and pieces to the 1200 such as crash bars, a bigger screen etc... it quickly ends up costing you the same as an Adventure that already has all of it standard. Suppose its a choice about how much weight you prepared to deal with and how much time you gonna spend in traffic. That Adventure is bloody wide! gotta be carefull when lane splitting not to take out the cars on either side!
Choices choices...
 

Offline Zulu Boy

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On Board Computer problems
« Reply #44 on: September 10, 2006, 11:59:21 am »
Hi
How accurate do you find the km range remaining? I have just taken mine in for 10,000 km service. It has been in the workshop 4 times to try and fix it. The combined total (The km's covered added to the km's remaining) ranges from about 330 to 610 - and that on the road back from Moz - driving speed relatively constant. It also INCREASES the km reaming e.g It would indicate at 280 km covered that I have 60km left nad then at 380 km covered, say that I have 75 km left!! (and that on the same tank).
Getting very frustrated at the moment!!
 

shark_za

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Re: On Board Computer problems
« Reply #45 on: September 10, 2006, 01:41:32 pm »
Quote from: "Alfie"
Hi
How accurate do you find the km range remaining? I have just taken mine in for 10,000 km service. It has been in the workshop 4 times to try and fix it. The combined total (The km's covered added to the km's remaining) ranges from about 330 to 610 - and that on the road back from Moz - driving speed relatively constant. It also INCREASES the km reaming e.g It would indicate at 280 km covered that I have 60km left nad then at 380 km covered, say that I have 75 km left!! (and that on the same tank).
Getting very frustrated at the moment!!


My BMW car has the same estimated range left, it is accurate and calculates your range at your current riding conditions. If you ride hard and use a lot of fuel it will calculate a short remaining distance, if you ride at 90-100 at constant highway pace you will see much more.
Whats so frustrating about that?

The total between 330 and 610 depends entirely on your right wrist and the more fuel efficient your riding style the further you will go. Doh.
The first 10L can get you 100km if you ride hard, the last 10L could get you 200km if you cruise. Its never linear. As the calculation is on your current consumption this makes perfect sense. You are not that technical hey, no hassle you have BMW on call!

Can just imagine the BMW technician getting this request from the customer to fix his fuel range meter. hahaha.
Solution, when it climbs high, open up the throttle and it will drop quicky
 

Online Welsh

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Re: On Board Computer problems
« Reply #46 on: September 10, 2006, 02:52:16 pm »
Quote from: "shark_za"
Can just imagine the BMW technician getting this request from the customer to fix his fuel range meter. hahaha.
Solution, when it climbs high, open up the throttle and it will drop quicky


I hope there is more to this than it appears, otherwise duh, technical was not somebodies strong point.

Welsh  8)
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Offline krazy-eyes

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« Reply #47 on: September 10, 2006, 06:29:11 pm »
this is one awesome report!!!!!!!!!!!

seriously. it is so damn professional it hurts!
the photo's are unreal (note how sequential pics line up to the milimeter)
the contrasts on the outdoor pics, and the cropping on close-up pics...unreal!

the writing is unbiassed and this is the 1st time ive read a report on the 1200GSA that tells you what you cannot already ascertain for yourself by looking at the pics (like most mags do :roll: ).

it is a shame the magazines of the world will never see this!......and the magazines of SA dont deserve such quality

well done man!
we can all learn from this  :notworthy:
 

Offline krazy-eyes

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« Reply #48 on: September 10, 2006, 06:34:23 pm »
Quote
You should consider a job in the journalism industry....


only problem is, in this country, journalism wont pay for his new toy   :roll:
 

Offline Gerrit Mocke

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Heated grips on non ABS GS1200
« Reply #49 on: September 12, 2006, 10:01:43 pm »
You can fit heated grips on your non ABS bike. I have similar bike and used the following parts to fit heated grips.
61-31-7-671-605  (heated handle left)
61-31-2-352-054 (heated handle right)
61-31-7-694-982 (comb. switch right)
After instalation take your bike to your local dealer to activate heated grips on the BMW computer. (I think it`s called motec.) I have done this on my new ADV and it works. Good writing. My mods and yours very similar.
 

Offline LuckyStriker

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Re: Heated grips on non ABS GS1200
« Reply #50 on: September 14, 2006, 08:14:04 am »
Quote from: "Gerrit Mocke"
You can fit heated grips on your non ABS bike...
Thanks Gerrit
I jotted down the part numbers and will speak to my dealer soon

It's funny how consumers sometimes know more about a product than supliers
 

Offline Stephan

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Product knowledge
« Reply #51 on: October 02, 2006, 10:09:54 am »
Nah, the suppliers know very well but understands profit better
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Offline macduff

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« Reply #52 on: October 29, 2006, 12:42:08 am »
a little late, but a truly entertaining and informative report......  :D  :D

many, many happy miles on it LS  :wink:
 

Offline KTM BIGGER

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« Reply #53 on: October 29, 2006, 03:46:04 am »
AMAZING REPORT!!!

This makes me wanna have a bike like that!!!!

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LuckyStriker?s R1200GS Adventure Report and Pimp Guide
« Reply #54 on: November 10, 2006, 10:07:12 am »
LS, nice report. I am awaiting delivery of an ADV and am very keen to replace the tyres with some more suited to tar and save the knoblies for those special occasions. Any recomendations?
 

Offline LuckyStriker

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« Reply #55 on: November 24, 2006, 10:33:39 am »
Quote from: "Steady"
LS, nice report. I am awaiting delivery of an ADV and am very keen to replace the tyres with some more suited to tar and save the knoblies for those special occasions. Any recomendations?
sorry for only getting back to you now. I have forgotten about this thread :oops:

I recommend Metzeller Tourance (German-made version is superior to the Korean)
Fairly priced
Excellent mileage
Excellent on Tar
Great in the rain
Great on gravel
Okay in sand
Horrendous in mud


...athough it saddens me to see a GSA without knobblies - true DS tyres (like the Tourance) are probably the wisest choice
 

Offline LuckyStriker

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« Reply #56 on: May 10, 2007, 02:53:33 pm »
Wow! How time flies! I can?t believe it?s been eight months that I?ve had this bike. It feels like I only got it yesterday.

Unfortunately I have not put on as many kilometres as I would have liked. I am only on 15000km now. That?s a measly 1875km/month average. I suppose I can blame it on the fact that I stay 8km from work and that the most beautiful mountain/ocean/karoo scenery is never more than a 100km away?

But still, I can now offer some feedback on the 1200ADV. Perhaps there is a fresh insight in my report, insights that I did not have during the early days of ownership.

Gearbox
Gear shifts are still as accurate as the day I got it. Changing down to first gear when I coast to a standstill at traffic lights is still a noisy affair. That first gear locks into place with a loud clunk! but I consider it to be a good thing. I never have any doubt that the right gear is engaged!
The gear sensor relays the correct message to the digital display on the instrument cluster. No more blanks or incorrect displays that plagued the early 1200?s so.
I also have not experienced any false neutrals or skipped gears. A flawless gearbox!

Brakes
To ABS or not to ABS? As you probably know, I chose a GS without ABS. After a few close calls on dirt with the ABS on, I decided to forgo on it when I got the GSA.
It is a blessing and a curse. No longer do I have to listen to that irritating servo whine! Never again do I have to stop and deactivate the ABS when I hit dirt roads. No longer do I have to worry about complete brake loss if the power is interrupted.

The normal hydraulic brakes are still excellent and the bike takes no effort at all to bring to a stop.
But? (and there is always a but)
The other night I was riding in the rain. It was dark and Durban Road was pretty much abandoned. Suddenly the traffic light ahead of me turned red and I was doing 120 in a 60 zone?on a soaked, oily road. I stepped on the rear and the backside began to snake, nothing too bad. I levelled it off by slowly modulating the front brake. I saw that I was not going to make it and probably end up in the middle of the intersection.

So I stepped down a gear to let the engine assist the braking. Wrong choice.
The shaft locked up the rear wheel and I skidded closer and closer to the line. I was doing about 40km/h now.
The only thing for it was to open up the throttle and jump the red light.
It is by no means certain but I think if I had ABS, I would probably have been able to stop in time.

Changes to the bike:
I took off that mudguard thing over the rear wheel. I don?t miss it. The bike gets no dirtier than with it on and I no longer have a concern of something hovering over my rear wheel that, if the bolts rattle out, will end up in the spokes while I?m cruising along at 140km/h.


The diff cover is great. People roll their eyes when they see it but I swear it has paid for itself over and over again. Unfortunately it is not too clear from this pic but the plastic is quite worn. I actually wiped it down with a damp cloth to clean it up so all the dirt you see is actually scratches, abrasions and cuts. I realise that metal is harder than plastic, but due to this piece of bling I KNOW that my diff is protected.


Those little winglets next to and behind the screen had to go. Apparently they keep more wind off the rider, increasing overall comfort. For dog?s sake people!!
It?s one more piece of plastic that can break (and need replacing). The wind on the lower body is not so bad (actually quite nice) and if that little breeze bothers you, you should get off bikes and drive a bloody cage! Plus, I think it looks stupid.

BMW wants me to take out a second mortgage on my house if I want a second Hella socket next to the handlebars. I said: "screw you", and went to a hardware store and got a standard 12v cigarette lighter socket (with waterproof cap) for R24.00. Fitting it was easy with a little help from a friend.
Now I can plug my iPod, cellphone, camera battery charger or whatever straight into the bike without the need of an adaptor.

If you go back to the first page of the thread you will see that I fitted those Touratech hand protector spoiler things. I took them off recently. The only things they are good for is to keep branches from whipping your hands when you bundu bash.
Their biggest drawback is steering instability when riding into a head wind. They act like little sails and cause tremors on the handlebars. Not nice. Here is a pic of the holes in the guards after the failed experiment.


Stephen King! I?m still waiting for my headlight protector! It?s been eight months now!
Look what a stone kicked up by another bike did to my headlight. A crack right down the middle. Fortunately water don?t penetrate to short out the lights. Replacing that headlight assy is out of the question. We?re talking thousands of bucks here. I?ll just have to crash and put in a big insurance claim for all the little dings and dongs that went kaka.


Snorkel
The snorkel mod came and went. I never encountered water deep enough to amaze the unfazed, so I can?t really comment on its success. All I can say is that it does not interfere with the engine performance provided you route the pipe correctly.


Spotlights:
I took the light bar and the spotlights off.
?What!? :you scream incredulously.
Yes. One was damaged during a recent toppling-over and I decided to take the whole gedoente off and box it (the damaged spot as since been repaired to perfect condition). Frankly the spots are a disappointment. They are utterly crap in the fog and you look like a jerk if you ride with them on all the time. The only good they do is to light up the bits on the side of the road. They add nothing to the beam reach and don?t turn the night into day. In the box they will stay until I sell the bike or head up to Nairobi.

Steering damper:
Took it off. I don?t miss it. My riding is never so hard core that the grips want to fly out of my hands. Shudders and shakes don?t really scare me. If I wanted a perfectly smooth ride I would have stuck to tarred roads. On sand the thing is pretty useless anyway. When the bike decides to take a nap there is very little you can do about it.

Luggage:
I still use the Zega pannier and they have served me extremely well. Any dents can be removed with little or no sign of repair afterwards. I also got the Givi 30l topbox which is a recent addition. I?m not crazy about it and wish I had the moola to buy something decent like the BMW box or anything by TT or SW-Motech.

Exhaust:
One of the first things I did was fit the Akra.
After 7 month I finally came to my senses. It?s a GS, it?s supposed to be a civilised bike. So I banned the noise and replaced the baffle. I am slowly getting used to the silence again but it?s not an easy thing.
Honestly, with the baffle in it still sounds better than the OEM pipe and it weighs less than half of the factory part. Looks a lot better too.
I?m almost convinced that loud is bad. I spooked several animals on our rides out in the velt. On a quiet bike you get such better results from nature.


Other issues:
The bike has been completely fault free. Not since that petrol tank seal right on day one did I have a need to return it to the dealer. In fact, I hardly see my dealer anymore. There is no need other to go in for a service or buy a new pair of genuine BMW underpants.

Do I still say it is better than the standard 1200?
Yes of course, don?t be stupid! The reason for saying that will take several beers and a heated conversation around the fire to explain.

Thank you for reading this follow up.
 

Offline Pistol

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« Reply #57 on: May 10, 2007, 03:47:33 pm »
LS, as a new member to this forum, I have only now read the whole report, and hell, 45min later and no work done, but it was well worth it - now got my mind thinking ADV??????
 

Offline Adventurer

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« Reply #58 on: May 10, 2007, 06:42:18 pm »
LS, what about a headlight protector from Big Country 4X4? Peaches has one on her GS, looks quite cool as well.
If you can keep your head in the midst of all this confusion, you don't understand the situation!
 

Offline michnus

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« Reply #59 on: May 10, 2007, 06:47:08 pm »
I have read many 1200ADV reports and your reports is about the best I have came across.

Your diff cover got me surprises in the beginning but looking at those marks on the cover it would have been on the diff, maybe not such a bad idea after all.

Contact Camojo he's got a decent looking light protector. Ventura also sells them but its a plastic stick on one, it might work for soft impacts but for bigger stones it will still break the lens.

On our last trip, on dirt with lekker groot middelmannetjies, I rode the 1200 onto the middelmannetjie, it start to weave violently, the moment you give it gas the bike tracks straight and out of the sand. I agree with you on the damper thing, a GS don't need one.

It cost you plenty but at least you can also now tell whats bling and whats really worth the money